Villanella


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Villanella

 

a genre of Italian everyday vocal music of the 15th and 16th centuries that developed from the peasant folk song. The music of the villanella is of a light character; frequently, dance music. Usually the villanella is homophonic, often for three voices, and includes parallel movement of the voices. Villanellas were performed without accompaniment or to the accompaniment of the lute. The form of the villanella is stanzas with a refrain. There are love-lyric, comic, satirical, and game villanellas and villanellas dealing with everyday life. The villanella originated in Naples, spread throughout Italy (among composers of villanellas are D. da Nola, O. Vecchi, L. Giustiniani, and B. Donato), and then to other countries. In 16th-century France, there appeared a French variety of villanella dealing with pastoral life.

A. G. IUSFIN

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Potra essere un errore che le rose e le viole stiano nello stesso mazzetto di una villanella italiana, ma di certo non c'e scandalo nel trovarle insieme nei giardini di Venere o in grembo a Clori
480) written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for the 1785 Vienna performance of Francesco Bianchi's comic opera La villanella rapita (and later appropriated into the reworked opera subtitled La villageoise enlevee, with a Paris premier in July 1789) inspires Michel Noiray's essay on the popular performances of Italian opera buffa at the Theatre de Monsieur between 1789 and 1792.
canzone, cultura popolare urbana, frottola, melodia accompagnata, musica italiana, musica rinascimentale, pop, popular music, villanella
En aquella epoca se caso con el empresario Mark Viro Villanella, con quien sigue casada y ha procreado 2 ninas, Kyara Sofia y Kaori Marcela, de 3 y un ano de edad.
Colin Slim (a villanella by Lasso in an anonymous painting), and Nicoletta Guidobaldi considers the concert as a pictorial theme.
For them, the 1610 publication represents instead a seminal work in the history of the sacred concertato style, sharing features with the secular madrigal, villanella, or canzonetta (such as pairs of voices in parallel thirds), and using imitative textures only very sparingly.
Since Cosi premiered in Calvesi's fifth season in Vienna, Mozart had many prior opportunities to observe him in at least twenty-one roles, and even contributed music for him in Francesco Bianchi's lit La villanella rapita in 1785.
Heinrich Besseler (Corpus Mensurabilis Musicae 1) [Rome: American Institute of Musicology, 1962], 20-30), which, in the final Amen melismas, contain, respectively, the following decidedly "profane" ditties: Tu m'as monte/asote su[s] Ia pance et riens n'a[s] fait; and La villanella non e bella se non la dominica.
4]) and reveal the influence of the Italian villanella (which Lagkhner acknowledges in his dedication) in their sectional, repeated forms, lively rhythms, and tendency toward homophony.
This chapter establishes that the practices of appropriation and adaptation that characterized much French literary and pictorial production of this period also figured in the composition and performance of strophic songs, some of which were influenced by the villanella, the Horatian ode, and Latin measured verse (transformed into French musique mesurie).
The standard sacred and secular vocal genres of mass, motet, litany, psalm, hymn, madrigal, French and Dutch chanson, villanella, and aria are all represented.