Villanella


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Villanella

 

a genre of Italian everyday vocal music of the 15th and 16th centuries that developed from the peasant folk song. The music of the villanella is of a light character; frequently, dance music. Usually the villanella is homophonic, often for three voices, and includes parallel movement of the voices. Villanellas were performed without accompaniment or to the accompaniment of the lute. The form of the villanella is stanzas with a refrain. There are love-lyric, comic, satirical, and game villanellas and villanellas dealing with everyday life. The villanella originated in Naples, spread throughout Italy (among composers of villanellas are D. da Nola, O. Vecchi, L. Giustiniani, and B. Donato), and then to other countries. In 16th-century France, there appeared a French variety of villanella dealing with pastoral life.

A. G. IUSFIN

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Potra essere un errore che le rose e le viole stiano nello stesso mazzetto di una villanella italiana, ma di certo non c'e scandalo nel trovarle insieme nei giardini di Venere o in grembo a Clori!
Genitivs (Hanser, 1997) and Villanella & Pantum (Hanser, 2000).
Further down the page are two stanzas quoted from a poem where a peasant girl complains of others not wanting her to speak--"non vuol pur ch'io favella"--which is translated by Bell as "Unwilling to enter a convent." And at the end of the stanza she reveals, "I am that little peasant girl"--"Io son quella Villanella"--giving her lament a pastoral tone.
The inclusion of a few Italian pieces, particularly those--like `Amarilli mia belle'--associated with the villanella or canzonetta repertory, in volumes mainly devoted to airs, again reflects a pattern found in contemporary prints.
Pairs of oboes and clarinets were also called for in Mozart's two contributions to a revival of Francesco Bianchi's La villanella rapita, the E flat major quartet 'Dite almeno in che mancai' K.479 and the latter part of the A major trio 'Mandina amabile' K.480 (both November 1785).
villanelle French, from Italian villanella rustic song, a derivative of villanorustic, unrefined
480) written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for the 1785 Vienna performance of Francesco Bianchi's comic opera La villanella rapita (and later appropriated into the reworked opera subtitled La villageoise enlevee, with a Paris premier in July 1789) inspires Michel Noiray's essay on the popular performances of Italian opera buffa at the Theatre de Monsieur between 1789 and 1792.
canzone, cultura popolare urbana, frottola, melodia accompagnata, musica italiana, musica rinascimentale, pop, popular music, villanella
En aquella epoca se caso con el empresario Mark Viro Villanella, con quien sigue casada y ha procreado 2 ninas, Kyara Sofia y Kaori Marcela, de 3 y un ano de edad.
La Villanella's Italian table linens and pillows had done so well in its first Atlanta show the company already planned to double its space in July.
Colin Slim (a villanella by Lasso in an anonymous painting), and Nicoletta Guidobaldi considers the concert as a pictorial theme.
For them, the 1610 publication represents instead a seminal work in the history of the sacred concertato style, sharing features with the secular madrigal, villanella, or canzonetta (such as pairs of voices in parallel thirds), and using imitative textures only very sparingly.