vinegar

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vinegar,

sour liquid consisting mainly of acetic acid and water, produced by the action of bacteria on dilute solutions of ethyl alcohol derived from previous yeast fermentationfermentation,
process by which the living cell is able to obtain energy through the breakdown of glucose and other simple sugar molecules without requiring oxygen. Fermentation is achieved by somewhat different chemical sequences in different species of organisms.
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. The coloring and flavoring are characteristic of the alcoholic liquor (as cider, beer, wine, fermented fruit juices, solutions of barley malt, hydrolyzed cereals, starches, or sugars) from which the vinegar is made. Vinegar is used as a salad dressing, a preservative, a household remedy to allay irritations, a mild disinfectant, and, in cooking, as a fiber softener. Vinegar has been known from antiquity as a natural byproduct of wine; the name is derived from the French vin aigre [sour wine]. The manufacture as a separate industry began in France in the 17th cent. The wasteful, slow, or natural, process, a spontaneous fermentation in casks half full of beechwood shavings exposed to the atmosphere by bung holes, was superseded in the early 19th cent. by the quick, or generator, method. The generator used in present-day commercial manufacture is usually a tall, truncated cone or vertical, wood tank with a false bottom perforated to admit air that is generally forced through by a blower. The alcoholic solution is allowed to drip through a filling of hard-wood shavings or other material presenting a large surface area. Vinegar made by this method must be aged to remove a natural harshness. It is generally clarified, then pasteurized. Some vinegars are subjected to distillation which removes most of the flavorings other than acetic acid. In another process, the solution is aerated directly by a spinning rotor. The wood shavings are not needed in this case, and the process runs continuously. Acetic fermentation may be impeded by an excessive growth of mother of vinegar, a slimy mass of bacteria, or of the parasitic vinegar eel, a minute, threadlike worm.

vinegar

[′vin·ə·gər]
(materials)
The product of the incomplete oxidation to acetic acid of ethyl alcohol produced by a primary fermentation of vegetable materials; contains not less than 4 grams of acetic acid per gallon; used in preparation of pickled fruits and vegetables and in salad dressing.

vinegar

given to Jesus to drink. [N.T.: Matthew 26:34, 48]

vinegar

a sour-tasting liquid consisting of impure dilute acetic acid, made by oxidation of the ethyl alcohol in beer, wine, or cider. It is used as a condiment or preservative
References in periodicals archive ?
Malt vinegar sales are falling but Ecovinal reckon they can cash in on the good exchange rate with the euro and their money-saving use of plastic bottles.
Popular tradition gives vinegar many healthful benefits, both through topical and internal use: it is antiseptic, antioxidant, purifying, soothing, protective, and toning.
Attractants included vinegar (Nakano all natural rice vinegar [Mizkan Americas Inc, Mt.
RAW VINEGAR An unpasteurized vinegar that still has its "mother," or starter, is the key for fermenting.
The OFT ruling followed the PS41 million Japanese takeover of Premier Foods' Manchester-based vinegar and pickles business in June last year, which had seen Mizkan inherit the famous Sarson's and Haywards brands.
The businesses, which are mainly based at Premier's Middleton factory near Manchester, are being sold to Mizkan, which has operations at Burntwood, Staffordshire, and is a major supplier of rice vinegar in the UK.
Declining sales of malt vinegar and a lack of trade interest in the overall vinegar category meant it was in danger of commoditisation, said Aspall commerical director Geoff Bradman.
Research on Vinegars Identification by Electronic Nose, Chinese Journal of Sensors and Actuators, 19(2006), 104-107.
Mixing a spirit with vinegar that has not been reduced or manipulated in some fashion results in an unappetizing cocktail, since the vinegar will overpower whatever it is mixed with and overwhelm the palette.
Spearmint, peppermint and chocolate mint can be added to most herbal vinegars if you like a touch of minty flavor.
Those early lessons in making spicy soups taught Kinder something else: white, jalapeno-soaked vinegar was just as tasty in the soup as was a version made with lime juice.
Weir's favorite potato salad dressing (for non-roasted potato salads) is equal amounts of yogurt, mayonnaise and sour cream with chopped mint, basil, parsley and green onions, white wine vinegar or lemon juice.