Virginia

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Virginia

, state, United States

Virginia, state of the S Middle-Atlantic United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean (E), North Carolina and Tennessee (S), Kentucky and West Virginia (W), and Maryland and the District of Columbia, largely across the Potomac River (N and NE).

Facts and Figures

Area, 40,817 sq mi (105,716 sq km). Pop. (2020) 8,631,393, a 6.7% increase since the 2010 census. As of the 2020 census, the state's population was: White alone, 69.4%; Black alone, 19.9%; Hispanic or Latino, 9.8%; American Indian and Alaska native alone, 0.5%; Asian alone, 6.9%; Two or More Races, 3.2%. Capital, Richmond. Largest city, Virginia Beach. Statehood, June 25, 1788 (10th of the original 13 states to ratify the Constitution). Highest pt., Mt. Rogers, 5,729 ft (1,747 m); lowest pt., sea level. Nickname, Old Dominion. Motto, Sic Semper Tyrannis [Thus Always to Tyrants]. State bird, cardinal. State flower, flowering dogwood. State tree, flowering dogwood. Abbr., Va.; VA

Geography

The most northerly of the Southern states, Virginia is roughly triangular in shape. The small section of the state that, along with Maryland and Delaware, occupies the Delmarva peninsula between Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean is separated from the main part of Virginia and is called the Eastern Shore. The coastal plain or tidewater region of E Virginia, generally flat and partly swampy, is cut by four great tidal rivers—the Potomac (forming most of the border with Maryland and beyond which also lies Washington, D.C.), the Rappahannock, the York, and the James—all of which empty into Chesapeake Bay. In the tidewater region stretch vast forests of pine and hardwood, highlighted in early spring by flowering redbud and dogwood.

In the west the tidewater region rises to c.300 ft. (90 m) at the fall line (passing through Richmond) and gives way to the Piedmont—rolling, generally fertile country that broadens gradually as it extends south to the North Carolina line. Rising abruptly in the western Piedmont is the Blue Ridge range, carpeted with bluegrass and ablaze in spring with rhododendron and mountain laurel; the Blue Ridge rises to the state's highest peak, Mt. Rogers (5,720 ft/1,743 m). Between the Blue Ridge and the Allegheny Plateau, both part of the Appalachian range, lies the valley and ridge province. One of the most prominent of these valleys is the Valley of Virginia; another is the rich and historic Shenandoah Valley.

Virginia's shores, mountains, mineral springs, natural wonders, and numerous historic sites draw millions of visitors annually. Crowning the hilltops and river bluffs from the Chesapeake region west to the Blue Ridge and adding to the grace and elegance of the Virginia landscape are the classic Greek revival homes and public buildings with their stately porticoes. Major tourist attractions include Shenandoah National Park; Colonial Williamsburg; and Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial. Other historic points of interest include Appomattox Court House National Historical Park; Manassas and Richmond national battlefield parks; Booker T. Washington and George Washington Birthplace national monuments; Colonial National Historical Park and Jamestown National Historic Site, both on Jamestown Island; and several national cemeteries and battlefields (see National Parks and Monuments, table).

Richmond is the capital, and Virginia Beach the largest city; other large cities are Norfolk; Newport News; Chesapeake; Hampton; Portsmouth; and Alexandria and Arlington (officially a county), both suburbs of Washington, D.C.

Economy

Virginia has an economy that is highly diversified. Agriculture, once its mainstay, now follows other sectors in employment and income generation. Tobacco, Virginia's traditional staple, is still the leading crop, and grains, corn, soybeans, peanuts, sweet potatoes, cotton, and apples (especially in the Shenandoah Valley) are all important. Wine production is also important; but the major sources of agricultural income are now poultry, dairy goods, and cattle, raised especially in the Valley of Virginia. The coastal fisheries are large, bringing in especially shellfish—largely oysters and crabs.

Coal is Virginia's chief mineral; stone, cement, sand, and gravel are also important. Roanoke is a center for the rail transport equipment industry, and a high proportion of the nation's shipyards are concentrated at Hampton Roads, especially in Newport News. Norfolk is a major U.S. naval base, and Portsmouth is a U.S. naval shipyard; Hampton is a center for aeronautical research. N Virginia has become the home of one of the largest concentrations of computer communications firms in the U.S. Other leading industries include tourism and the manufacture of chemicals, electrical equipment, and food, textile, and paper products. Tens of thousands of Virginians work in government, especially in the District of Columbia or in nearby “Beltway” suburbs like Reston and Langley.

Government, Politics, and Higher Education

Virginia is officially styled a commonwealth. The Virginia constitution was revised extensively in the late 1960s. The legislature (called the general assembly) consists of a house of delegates of 100 members and a senate with 40 members. The governor serves a four-year term and is ineligible for reelection. Virginia sends 11 representatives and 2 senators to the U.S. Congress and has 13 electoral votes. Long a Democratic stronghold, the commonwealth now has highly competitive two-party politics.

Among Virginia's many institutions of higher learning are the College of William and Mary in Virginia, mainly at Williamsburg; George Mason Univ., at Fairfax; Hampton Univ. (formerly Hampton Institute), at Hampton; the Univ. of Mary Washington, at Fredericksburg; Randolph College, at Lynchburg; Randolph-Macon College, at Ashland; Sweet Briar College, at Sweet Briar; the Univ. of Virginia, mainly at Charlottesville; Virginia Commonwealth Univ., at Richmond; Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee Univ., at Lexington; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., at Blacksburg; and Virginia State Univ., at Petersburg.

History

Early Settlements of the Virginia Company

Virginia (named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen) at first included in its lands the whole vast area of North America not held by the Spanish or French. The colony on Roanoke Island, organized by Sir Walter Raleigh, failed, but the English soon made another attempt slightly farther north. In 1606 James I granted a charter to the London Company (better known later as the Virginia Company), a group of merchants lured by the thought of easy profits in mining and trade. The company sent three ships and 144 men under captains Christopher Newport, Bartholomew Gosnold, and John Ratcliffe to establish a base, and the tiny force entered Chesapeake Bay in Apr., 1607. On a peninsula in the James River they founded (May 13, 1607) the first permanent English settlement in America, which they called Jamestown. It soon became clear that the company's original plans were unrealistic, and the Jamestown settlers began a long and unexpected struggle to live off the land.

By 1608, despite the firm and resourceful leadership of John Smith, hunger and disease had reduced their numbers to 38. The company responded by sending supplies and men as well as new leadership in the person of Sir Thomas Gates, who was to take charge as deputy governor under the authority of a new charter (1609). Gates arrived in 1610 to find that only a handful of settlers had survived the terrible winter (the “starving time”) of 1609–10. He decided to take them back to England, but as they were about to abandon the colony in June, 1610, his superior, Gov. Thomas West, Baron De la Warr, ordered them to reoccupy Jamestown. Although sickness and starvation continued to take a heavy toll, the settlement at last began to make headway under the harsh regimes of Sir Thomas Dale, De la Warr's successor in 1611, and later under that of Sir Samuel Argall.

Tobacco, first cultivated by John Rolfe in 1612, gave the company new hope of a profitable return on its investment. To encourage settlement and improve agricultural productivity it granted colonists (still technically employees and shareholders) the right to own private gardens, then, at the urging of Sir Edwin Sandys, promised to give 100 acres (40 hectares) of its land to purchasers of stock and 50 acres (20 hectares) to settlers who brought over other settlers at his own expense (the “head-right” system). The company also set up smaller joint-stock companies to settle vast tracts known as “colonies” or “hundreds.” In 1619, at the instruction of the company, Gov. George Yeardley provided additional incentives to settlers by forming a house of burgesses—the first representative assembly in the New World—and in 1620 by beginning to send women to the colony.

Although these various expedients did succeed in attracting new settlers and strengthening the colony, the company itself failed to prosper. Rolfe's marriage (1614) to Pocahontas, daughter of chief Powhatan, secured good relations with the Native Americans for a time, but in 1622 Powhatan's son Opechancanough led the Powhatan Confederacy in a surprise attack on the colony, killing 350 settlers (about one third of the total community). English retaliation effectively ended Native American resistance, except for a final uprising of the Confederacy in 1644. However, the 1622 attack had delivered a fatal blow to the company, and in 1624, beset by internal dissension, it surrendered its charter to the crown.

A Royal Colony

After almost two decades as a private enterprise, Virginia became a royal colony, the first in English history. Partly because the English kings were occupied with affairs at home, the Virginia house of burgesses was able to continue its functions and won formal recognition in the late 1630s. Thus representative government under royal domain was assured. By 1641, when Sir William Berkeley became governor, the colony was well established and extended on both sides of the James up to its falls.

Three fourths of the European settlers (about 7,500 in 1641) had come as indentured servants or apprentices, but many of them became freemen and small farmers. In 1641 there were also about 250 Africans (the first had arrived in 1619 on a Dutch ship), most of whom were indentured servants rather than slaves. The freeholders, together with the merchant class (from which were descended most of the “first families of Virginia”), controlled the government. Only white males were enfranchised, and property-owning qualifications for voting continued during and after the colonial period.

Most of the white settlers were Anglicans, and during the civil war in England, many well-to-do Englishmen (mainly Anglicans and supporters of Charles I, if not actually Cavaliers) came to Virginia. The colony was understandably loyal to the crown until 1652, when an expedition sent by Oliver Cromwell forced it to adhere to the Puritan Commonwealth. With the Commonwealth busy at home, Virginia was practically independent until 1660, engaging in free trade with foreigners, especially the Dutch, and enjoying the profits of the expanding tobacco and fur trade. This prosperous era came to an end with the Restoration in 1660.

The Navigation Acts forced the tobacco trade to use only English ships and English ports, which were at first insufficient to handle it; tobacco piled up in Virginia and in England, and prices plummeted. The wealthy planters weathered this depression, but the small farmers faced ruin. Serious discontent spread and was aggravated by Gov. Berkeley's high-handed policies, by his favoritism toward the wealthy tidewater planters, and by his refusal to sanction a campaign against the Native Americans who had been attacking frontier settlements. These grievances brought the eruption of Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. The unfortunate death of Nathaniel Bacon left the yeomen leaderless, and they were put down so ruthlessly that Berkeley was recalled to England.

Tidewater Plantations and Westward Migration

Expansion of the plantation system was made possible only with the use of slave labor (first recognized in law in 1662), and tens of thousands of Africans were being imported every year by the end of the century. Small, independent cultivators, unable to compete with the plantation-slave system, formed the nucleus of a poor white class that drifted southward or pioneered to the west. Also contributing to westward settlement were the French Huguenots, who came to Virginia by the end of the 17th cent. and began to settle the Piedmont.

Westward movement was stimulated under Gov. Alexander Spotswood, who himself discovered (1716) the Swift Run Gap in the Blue Ridge Mts., leading into the Shenandoah valley. Spotswood also imported (1714–17) Germans to work his iron furnaces in the Piedmont area, and numerous others followed their countrymen. They helped settle the Shenandoah valley (beginning c.1730) as did many newcomers from Pennsylvania—German Lutherans, English Quakers, Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, and a lesser number of Welsh Baptists.

Soil exhaustion from continuous tobacco cultivation hastened the westward march, as did the settlement activities of land speculators like Spotswood and William Byrd (d. 1744). Many of these speculators were indebted eastern planters attempting to salvage their fortunes. The Ohio Company grant (1749) furthered exploration beyond the Allegheny Mts. but brought conflict with the French.

The activities and interests of the new frontier settlements contrasted sharply with the plantation life of the tidewater region, where the lavish material life of the planter aristocracy was complemented by high cultural accomplishments and by the spread of the ideas of the Enlightenment. The last of the French and Indian Wars, in which Virginians—notably Col. George Washington—were prominent, ended the French obstacle to westward migration. After the war many indebted planters were disturbed by England's own limitations on westward settlement.

The American Revolution

Along with Massachusetts, Virginia was a leader in the movement that culminated in the American Revolution although, despite the burning oratory of Patrick Henry and the enlightened political writings of Thomas Jefferson and other brilliant native spokesmen, Virginia was never as politically discontent or radical as Massachusetts. In 1773 the burgesses at Williamsburg (the capital since 1699), led by Richard Henry Lee, formed an intercolonial committee of correspondence. The Virginia leaders proposed (May, 1774) a congress of all the colonies, delegates were chosen at the First Virginia Convention (Aug.), and in September Virginia's Peyton Randolph was elected president of the First Continental Congress. The next year, in June, George Washington was made commander in chief of the Continental Army.

After the patriots forced the royal governor, John Murray, earl of Dunmore, to flee, the Fifth Virginia Convention (May 6–June 29, 1776) declared the colony's independence, instructed the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress to propose general colonial independence (resulting in the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson), and adopted a declaration of rights and the first constitution of a free American state, both drawn up by George Mason. Patrick Henry was elected the first governor.

Although the British had burned Norfolk in Jan., 1776, they did not invade the state in full force until 1779, when they took Portsmouth and Suffolk. Continentals under Lafayette came to Virginia in 1780, and the British cause was lost as American land forces and a French fleet combined to bring about Cornwallis's surrender (Oct. 19, 1781) in the Yorktown campaign. Meanwhile, George Rogers Clark and his Virginians had wrested (1779) the Northwest Territory from the British, and in 1784 Virginia yielded its claim to this area to the federal government.

Virginia's Role in the New Nation

During the Revolution a degree of religious freedom had been instituted in Virginia under the lead of Jefferson. Other reforms had removed entail and primogeniture from land tenure, liberalized the legal code, and abolished further importation of slaves. A liberal law for formal emancipation of slaves was passed in 1782 and remained in force for more than 20 years. In 1786 a statute for religious freedom, championed by James Madison, completed the disestablishment of the Anglican Church and established complete religious equality for all Virginians.

In replacing the unsatisfactory Articles of Confederation with the Constitution of the United States, Virginians, especially James Madison, again played leading roles. Other leaders such as Patrick Henry, Edmund Pendleton, and Edmund Randolph at various times opposed the document, but the state ratified it (June 26, 1788) with both tidewater and western support. Later, another Virginian, Chief Justice John Marshall, later gave the document much of its strength. The Old Dominion ceded (1789) a portion of its Potomac lands to the United States for the creation of the District of Columbia. In 1792, Kentucky, a Virginia county since 1776, was admitted to the Union as a separate state. After Madison and Jefferson raised an opposition to the financial program of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, Virginia supported the emerging Democratic-Republican party's struggle against the Federalists and became a hotbed of states' rights sentiment (see Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions).

Of the first 12 Presidents of the United States, seven were Virginians—Washington, Jefferson, Madison, James Monroe (these four comprising the “Virginia Dynasty”), William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Zachary Taylor. Later, in the 20th cent., the name of Woodrow Wilson was to further lengthen the generally distinguished list of Virginian presidents.

The native sons who led the country during the 1800s sometimes expanded national power and national development to an extent that many states' rights Virginians deemed unconstitutional. However, Virginia itself, stimulated by western complaints, embarked on a vigorous policy of internal improvements in the second and third decades of the 19th cent. The tidewater majority made few concessions to western demands for male suffrage and other reforms in the constitution of 1830. Economically, however, the whole state benefited from transportation improvements, from the growth of scientific agriculture and the spread of wheat cultivation, and from the growth of such industries as tobacco processing and iron manufacture.

Slavery, Insurrection, and Civil War

As the cotton economy grew in the newer Southern states the tidewater became a breeding ground for the slaves they needed. Elsewhere in the state, especially in the west, antislavery sentiment was strong in the early 19th cent., and following the slave insurrection (1831) led by Nat Turner the house of delegates voted down a bill to abolish slavery by the narrow margin of seven votes. The insurrection did result in harsher laws and more conservative policies regarding African Americans. The constitution of 1851, granted suffrage to “every white male citizen,” and thus effected reapportionment of representation.

For the most part Virginians labored to avert conflict between North and South. But “fire-eaters” such as Edmund Ruffin and abolitionists such as John Brown of Harpers Ferry fame, shaped the course that led to the Civil War. Secession came (Apr. 17, 1861) only after all attempts to keep peace had failed. Virginia joined the Confederacy, and Richmond became the Confederate capital. Robert E. Lee entered the military service of the South's new government, but not a few Virginians such as Winfield Scott, George H. Thomas, and David G. Farragut remained loyal to the Union. Most Virginians who lived west of the Appalachians also opposed secession, and on June 20, 1863, this section was admitted to the Union as the new state of West Virginia. As the conflict progressed, Virginia emerged as the chief battleground of the Civil War.

In the beginning the Union armies repeatedly suffered setbacks—at the first battle of Bull Run (July 21, 1861), in the Seven Days battles of the Peninsular campaign (April-July, 1862) after the Monitor and Merrimack had clashed in Hampton Roads, and in lesser but related campaigns such as the triumph of Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson in the Shenandoah valley. The second battle of Bull Run (Aug., 1862) was a smashing victory for Lee, but in the Antietam campaign (Sept., 1862) he fared no better than Union Gen. George B. McClellan in invading enemy country. However, in the battles of Fredericksburg (Dec. 13, 1862) and Chancellorsville (May 2–4, 1863), the Federals under Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside and then under Gen. Joseph Hooker were again repulsed.

Thus encouraged, Lee and his lieutenants—James Longstreet, R. S. Ewell, A. P. Hill, and J. E. B. Stuart—undertook another invasion of the North but failed against George G. Meade in the Gettysburg campaign (June–July, 1863). That campaign marked the beginning of the end for the Confederacy, although it took considerable bloody pounding by Gen. U. S. Grant in the Wilderness campaign (May–June, 1864) and the siege of Petersburg (1864–65) before Lee surrendered what remained of his Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Courthouse (see under Appomattox) on Apr. 9, 1865. President Jefferson Davis had already fled Richmond, and the Confederacy soon collapsed.

Postwar Political Reform and a New Economy

The war left its marks on the land and the people. The Shenandoah Valley was particularly desolate after the campaigns of Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early and Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan in 1864. But poverty-stricken as it was after the war, the state, under Gov. Francis H. Pierpont, escaped the worst aspects of Reconstruction. Radical Republicans were but briefly in power. On the recommendation (1869) of President Ulysses S. Grant, Congress allowed Virginia to vote without coercion, and the state passed the essential clauses of a constitution that the Radicals had drafted (1868), providing for free public schools and heavy taxes on land. More importantly, Virginia was allowed to elect to office its own moderate party, the “white Republicans,” led by Gen. William Mahone. Radical sway was ended. In 1870, after the Virginia assembly had ratified the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution, the state was readmitted to the Union.

The abolition of slavery and the hard agricultural times of postwar decades ended the plantation system in Virginia and brought some increase in farm tenancy, but the economy benefited from diversification as fruit farming and the tobacco industry became important. To offset declines in demand for dark Virginia tobacco, the bright-leaf variety was increasingly grown.

Politics and Industry in the Early Twentieth Century

In 1902 a new state constitution demanded rigorous literacy tests for voters, thus completing the long process of reducing the black electorate. During the years preceding World War I, Virginia's prosperity grew as dairy farming in particular gained importance. During the war agriculture boomed, as did industry. Especially prosperous were the important shipbuilding works at Hampton Roads.

In the mid-1920s, Harry Flood Byrd assumed direction of the state's powerful Democratic organization, formerly headed by U.S. Senator Thomas S. Martin and Methodist Episcopal Bishop James Cannon, Jr. Byrd, governor from 1926 to 1930 and U.S. Senator from 1933 until 1965, became the most influential figure in the state. As chief executive he initiated a sound reorganization of the state government, brought about the passage of the first antilynching law adopted by any state, and improved the highway system. However, the organization's chief boast was that the state was entirely free of debt due to a rigid “pay-as-you-go” policy. Liberals criticized this financial policy for scrimping on public education and welfare.

In the Great Depression of the 1930s Virginia fared better than many states. Its industries had not been overexpanded, and, more important, the state's economy was built around consumer goods—foods, textiles, and tobacco—that remained in relatively high demand. Farmers benefited from the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, but conservative Virginians resisted some of the economic policies of the New Deal. In World War II Virginia was the scene of much military training, and the shipyards at Hampton Roads and other industries again aided the war effort. In the prosperous postwar period the conservative Byrd organization maintained its power.

Desegregation and Growth

After the 1954 Supreme Court decision on public school integration, attempts at desegregating Virginia's schools proceeded slowly. After Virginia courts and federal courts ruled illegal the order by Gov. J. Lindsay Almond, Jr., to close public schools in nine counties, a lame compromise of “local option” was adopted. With the exception of Prince Edward County, where schools remained closed from 1959 until 1964, all parts of Virginia had accepted at least token integration by the mid-1960s. In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder, a Democrat, became the first African American elected governor in Virginia.

Mark R. Warner, a Democrat, was elected in 2001; his lieutenant governor, Democrat Timothy M. Kaine, was elected governor in 2005. Both Warner and Kaine would be elected to the U.S. Senate. Republicans regained the governorship after Robert F. McDonnell was elected in 2009, but Democrat Terry McAuliffe won in 2013, and McAuliffe's lieutenant governor, Democrat Ralph Northam, won in 2017. Northam faced a scandal when an earlier photo of the young governor wearing blackface at a college event surfaced, but he successfully resisted calls on him to resign. After eight years of Democratic reign, Republican Glenn Youngkin handily defeated McAuliffe who was running for a new term in 2021.

Virginia has benefited in recent decades from increased federal spending. In the 1980s the Hampton Roads area saw a naval shipbuilding boom. The greatest growth, however, has come in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., where expanded federal offices and hundreds of quasi-official and private organizations engaged in lobbying, communications, and other businesses that owe their existence to proximity to the seat of the government have in turn spawned trade and service hubs like Dale City and Tysons Corner.

Bibliography

See F. B. Simkins et al., Virginia: History, Government, Geography (1957); C. H. Ambler, Sectionalism in Virginia from 1776 to 1861 (1910, repr. 1964); P. A. Bruce, Social Life of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century (1907, repr. 1964), Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century (2 vol., 1896; repr. 1966), and Institutional History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century (2 vol., 1910; repr. 1964); H. J. Eckenrode, The Political History of Virginia during the Reconstruction (1904, repr. 1971); J. Gottmann, Virginia in Our Century (1969); C. C. Pearson, The Readjuster Movement in Virginia, 1847–1861 (1917, repr. 1969); E. S. Morgan, American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (1975); V. Dabney, Virginia, the New Dominion (1971, repr. 1983); D. Staff, Virginia Atlas and Gazetteer (1989); G. Milton, Big Chief Elizabeth: The Adventures and Fate of the First English Colonists in America (2000).


Virginia

, city, United States
Virginia, city (1990 pop. 9,410), St. Louis co., NE Minn., on the Mesabi range; inc. 1892. In addition to its iron mines—both open-pit and underground—the city has foundries, lumbering, and food-processing and manufacturing plants. Dairy cattle and poultry are raised and oats and alfalfa are grown. Tourism is economically important, and many recreational and ski areas are nearby. The Minnesota Museum of Mining is there.

Virginia

, ship
Virginia, Confederate name for the ironclad Merrimack. See Monitor and Merrimack.

Virginia

, in Roman legend
Virginia, in Roman legend, daughter of the centurion Virginius. Her father stabbed her to save her from the lust of Appius Claudius Crassus, decemvir. This precipitated the fall of the decemvirs. The story occurs often in literature.
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Virginia State Information

Phone: (804) 786-0000
www.virginia.gov


Area (sq mi):: 42774.20 (land 39594.07; water 3180.13) Population per square mile: 191.10
Population 2005: 7,567,465 State rank: 0 Population change: 2000-20005 6.90%; 1990-2000 14.40% Population 2000: 7,078,515 (White 70.20%; Black or African American 19.60%; Hispanic or Latino 4.70%; Asian 3.70%; Other 4.40%). Foreign born: 8.10%. Median age: 35.70
Income 2000: per capita $23,975; median household $46,677; Population below poverty level: 9.60% Personal per capita income (2000-2003): $31,087-$33,730
Unemployment (2004): 3.70% Unemployment change (from 2000): 1.40% Median travel time to work: 27.00 minutes Working outside county of residence: 51.80%

List of Virginia counties:

  • Accomack County
  • Albemarle County
  • Alexandria (Independent City)
  • Alleghany County
  • Amelia County
  • Amherst County
  • Appomattox County
  • Arlington County
  • Augusta County
  • Bath County
  • Bedford (Independent City)
  • Bedford County
  • Bland County
  • Botetourt County
  • Bristol (Independent City)
  • Brunswick County
  • Buchanan County
  • Buckingham County
  • Buena Vista (Independent City)
  • Campbell County
  • Caroline County
  • Carroll County
  • Charles City County
  • Charlotte County
  • Charlottesville (Independent City)
  • Chesapeake (Independent City)
  • Chesterfield County
  • Clarke County
  • Colonial Heights (Independent City)
  • Covington (Independent City)
  • Craig County
  • Culpeper County
  • Cumberland County
  • Danville (Independent City)
  • Dickenson County
  • Dinwiddie County
  • Emporia (Independent City)
  • Essex County
  • Fairfax (Independent City)
  • Fairfax County
  • Falls Church (Independent City)
  • Fauquier County
  • Floyd County
  • Fluvanna County
  • Franklin (Independent City)
  • Franklin County
  • Frederick County
  • Fredericksburg (Independent City)
  • Galax (Independent City)
  • Giles County
  • Gloucester County
  • Goochland County
  • Grayson County
  • Greene County
  • Greensville County
  • Halifax County
  • Hampton (Independent City)
  • Hanover County
  • Harrisonburg (Independent City)
  • Henrico County
  • Henry County
  • Highland County
  • Hopewell (Independent City)
  • Isle of Wight County
  • James City County
  • King & Queen County
  • King George County
  • King William County
  • Lancaster County
  • Lee County
  • Lexington (Independent City)
  • Loudoun County
  • Louisa County
  • Lunenburg County
  • Lynchburg (Independent City)
  • Madison County
  • Manassas (Independent City)
  • Manassas Park (Independent City)
  • Martinsville (Independent City)
  • Mathews County
  • Mecklenburg County
  • Middlesex County
  • Montgomery County
  • Nelson County
  • New Kent County
  • Newport News (Independent City)
  • Norfolk (Independent City)
  • Northampton County
  • Northumberland County
  • Norton (Independent City)
  • Nottoway County
  • Orange County
  • Page County
  • Patrick County
  • Petersburg (Independent City)
  • Pittsylvania County
  • Poquoson (Independent City)
  • Portsmouth (Independent City)
  • Powhatan County
  • Prince Edward County
  • Prince George County
  • Prince William County
  • Pulaski County
  • Radford (Independent City)
  • Rappahannock County
  • Richmond (Independent City)
  • Richmond County
  • Roanoke (Independent City)
  • Roanoke County
  • Rockbridge County
  • Rockingham County
  • Russell County
  • Salem (Independent City)
  • Scott County
  • Shenandoah County
  • Smyth County
  • Southampton County
  • Spotsylvania County
  • Stafford County
  • Staunton (Independent City)
  • Suffolk (Independent City)
  • Surry County
  • Sussex County
  • Tazewell County
  • Virginia Beach (Independent City)
  • Warren County
  • Washington County
  • Waynesboro (Independent City)
  • Westmoreland County
  • Williamsburg (Independent City)
  • Winchester (Independent City)
  • Wise County
  • Wythe County
  • York County
  • Counties USA: A Directory of United States Counties, 3rd Edition. © 2006 by Omnigraphics, Inc.

    Virginia Parks

    Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
    The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

    Virginia

     

    a state in the eastern part of the USA. Area, 105,700 sq km. Population, 4.5 million (1970 census), more than one-fifth of whom are Negroes. Urban population 56 percent (1960). Administrative center, Richmond.

    The Atlantic Lowland, deeply indented by the Chesapeake Bay and its river estuaries, is in the eastern part of Virginia. The Appalachian Mountains (elevation, 1,743 m) are in the west and the Piedmont Plateau is in the central part of the state. The suburbs of Washington, D.C., the capital of the USA, extend into northeastern Virginia. The mean temperatures range from —1° to 5° C in January and from 23° to 26° C in July. Annual precipitation amounts to more than 1,000 mm. The most important rivers—the James and the Potomac—are navigable in their lower courses. There are coniferous and deciduous forests on the slopes of the Appalachians.

    Virginia is an industrial-agrarian state. Its industrial development has been facilitated by its advantageous geographical position, its transportation conditions, and by the presence of large reserves of coal and waterpower. Coal mining (33 million tons in 1967) in the Appalachian Coal Basin is the most important branch of the mining industry (15,000 employees in 1968). Lead, zinc, and building materials are also mined. The capacity of the state’s electric power plants totaled 6-million kilowatts (kW) in 1968, including 900,000 kW from hydroelectric power plants. Processing industries employed 360,000 people in 1968. The chemical industry is at the highest stage of development with the production of cellulose and synthetic fibers (Roanoke and Newport News), fertilizers, and so on. There is large-scale commercial and military shipbuilding in the Hampton Roads Harbor (Norfolk, Newport News, and Portsmouth). The knitting, textile, and garment industries are well developed (on the basis of chemical fibers), as are the tobacco, food, paper, furniture, electrical equipment, and radioelectronics industries. The principal farm crop is tobacco, primarily in the Piedmont; Virginia is third or fourth in tobacco production in the USA. Virginia’s other crops include wheat in the northwest, peanuts in the south, early potatoes and vegetables, and fruits. Approximately one-half of the commercial agricultural output is accounted for by livestock breeding, including poultry raising (broilers); in 1968 there were 1.4 million head of cattle (including 260,000 dairy cows). Oysters are harvested and shrimp are caught along the coast. The major ports in Hampton Roads Harbor are Norfolk and Newport News.

    V. M. GOKHMAN

    Virginia is one of the original states of the USA. It was established in 1776 during the War for Independence in North America (1775-83) in place of the British colony of the same name, which had been founded in 1607. During the Civil War (1861-65), Virginia was a member of the slave-holding Confederacy. The sharpening of relations between the slaveholding planters of the eastern region of Virginia and the farmers of the western part of the state led to the secession of West Virginia in 1863 and its establishment as an independent state.

    The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Virginia

    Tenth state; adopted the U.S. Constitution on June 25, 1788 (seced­ed from the Union in April 1861, and was readmitted on January 26, 1870)

    State capital: Richmond Nicknames: Old Dominion; Mother of Presidents; Mother of Statesmen State motto: Sic semper tyrannis (Latin “Thus ever to

    tyrants”) State beverage: Milk State bat: Virginia big-eared bat (Corynorhinus (= Plecotus)

    townsendii virginianus) State bird: Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) State boat: Chesapeake Bay Deadrise State dog: American foxhound State festival: Virginia Covered Bridge Festival. State fish: Brook trout (salvelinus fontinalis) State flower: American dogwood (Cornus florida) State folk dance: Square dance State folklore center: Blue Ridge Institute State fossil: Chesapecten jeffersonius (scallop) State insect: Tiger swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus

    Linne) State shell: Oyster shell (Crassostraea virginica) State song: “Carry Me Back to Old Virginia” had been state

    song since 1940; the state held a contest to choose a new song in 1998, but none has been selected (as of April, 2008)

    State tree: American dogwood (Cornus florida)

    More about state symbols at:

    www.virginia.org/site/features.asp?FeatureID=138
    www.virginia.gov/cmsportal2/facts_and_history_4096/facts_4104/trivia_facts.html
    www.vatc.org/pr/facts/factsymbols.asp

    SOURCES:

    AmerBkDays-2000, p. 476 AnnivHol-2000, p. 106

    STATE OFFICES:

    State web site: www.virginia.gov

    Office of the Governor Capitol Bldg 3rd Fl Richmond, VA 23219 804-786-2211 fax: 804-371-6351 www.governor.virginia.gov

    Secretary of the Commonwealth 830 E Main St 14th Fl Richmond, VA 23219 804-786-2441 fax: 804-371-0017 www.soc.state.va.us

    Library of Virginia 800 E Broad St Richmond, VA 23219 804-692-3500 fax: 804-692-3594 www.lva.lib.va.us

    Legal Holidays:

    Columbus Day and Yorktown Victory DayOct 10, 2011; Oct 8, 2012; Oct 14, 2013; Oct 13, 2014; Oct 12, 2015; Oct 10, 2016; Oct 9, 2017; Oct 8, 2018; Oct 14, 2019; Oct 12, 2020; Oct 11, 2021; Oct 10, 2022; Oct 9, 2023
    Day after ThanksgivingNov 25, 2011; Nov 23, 2012; Nov 29, 2013; Nov 28, 2014; Nov 27, 2015; Nov 25, 2016; Nov 24, 2017; Nov 23, 2018; Nov 29, 2019; Nov 27, 2020; Nov 26, 2021; Nov 25, 2022; Nov 24, 2023
    Lee-Jackson DayJan 14, 2011; Jan 13, 2012; Jan 18, 2013; Jan 17, 2014; Jan 16, 2015; Jan 15, 2016; Jan 13, 2017; Jan 12, 2018; Jan 18, 2019; Jan 17, 2020; Jan 15, 2021; Jan 14, 2022; Jan 13, 2023
    Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.

    Virginia

    first of the Thirteen Colonies. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 289]
    See: Firsts
    Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Virginia

    a state of the eastern US, on the Atlantic: site of the first permanent English settlement in North America; consists of a low-lying deeply indented coast rising inland to the Piedmont plateau and the Blue Ridge Mountains. Capital: Richmond. Pop.: 7 386 330 (2003 est.). Area: 103 030 sq. km (39 780 sq. miles)
    Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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