Aeneid

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Aeneid

Virgil’s epic poem glorifying the origin of the Roman people. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Epic
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
She has discussed Montaigne's own awareness of the ambiguous quality of hi s writing, and traced his view of the labyrinth, a term he uses only once, to essential passages in Ovid's Metamorphoses and Virgil's Aeneid. [3] One could add to her remarks that a medieval etymology for "labyrinth," "labor" + intus" or "internal work," adequately captures the nature of Montaigne's literary project: an exploration of an individual's consciousness in its multifarious meanderings, turns and returns, which represent the inner and apparently directionless labor the essayist believes to be characteristic of human efforts at reasoning and at assessing our place in the world.
The legend found its most famous literary expression in Virgil's Aeneid.
James Shulman's "The Pale Cast of Thought" undertakes a comprehensive discussion of many epics, beginning with Aeneas's moment of hesitation before killing Turnus in Virgil's Aeneid and proceeding to similar moments in Renaissance epics by Ariosto, Tasso, Spenser, and Milton.
This revision also included philosophical commentaries translated from various ancient authors and a translation of Book I of Virgil's Aeneid. John Dryden called him "the best versifier of the former age" and commended his ability to give his verse the same turn as the original, and many later poet-critics also attested to the value of his translations.
Envy, an important figure in the action, harks back to Ovid as well as to the war in the last books of Virgil's Aeneid. But despite the allusions and the awareness of the "split" in this canto, the power of its fantasy and imaginative quality supersedes everything else.
The story of the Trojan origin, through Aeneas, of Rome helped to inspire Roman interest; Book 2 of Virgil's Aeneid contains the best-known account of the sack of Troy.
After a first chapter that challenges new historicist critiques of psychoanalysis, and a second that interprets Virgil's Aeneid, the book turns to the Renaissance epic, with sustained studies of Ariosto, Tasso and Spenser.
A second edition "with divers other poems" (1648) included his version of the fourth book of Virgil's Aeneid, in Spenserian stanza.
Specialists in Homer have found concentric patterns (what are here called symmetrical structures) in the Iliad and the Odyssey, and George Duckworth argued for the presence of golden mean ratios in Virgil's Aeneid. In the Renaissance, specialists have found such patterns functioning as structural devices in Montaigne's Essays and most recently in Rabelais and Ariosto.
The entire Baldus can be seen as an elaborate spoof of Virgil's Aeneid, with numerous sly references to Dante.
Briefly stated, it is a dialogue ill four books concerning the best life (book I), the highest good (book 2), and an allegorical interpretation of the first six books of Virgil's Aeneid (books 3 and 4).
His examples are the story of Procne and Philomela from Ovid's Metamorphosis, the story of Esther and Haman from the Old Testament, as retold by Brunetto Latini, and the story of Amata, the Queen of the Latins, from Virgil's Aeneid. At issue is how these stories, but Virgil's in particular, make use of the imagination to represent wrath.