Embodied water

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Embodied water

The amount of water required to manufacture products, including the extracting the raw materials, transporting those materials, and processing them into the final product.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An observation of this study was that in the HMDA region, 96 per cent of water is consumed as virtual water and only 4 per cent is ingested directly.
Can pumping virtual water lead to real-world solutions?
However, we did not force participants to turn off the faucet that would keep virtual water flowing and wasted.
Virtual water worlds are what have become of 245 villages located downstream of the Pampanga River in Central Luzon, after more than two months of rain.
VIRTUAL WATER WORLD -- At least 7 barangays Hagonoy including the villages of Sta Elena and Sto Nino which shown in the photo and 2 in Paombong, Bulacan were submerged under 2 to 3 feet of rising flood waters which is being aggravated by the perennial high tide and non-stop heavy rains since Monday.
In order to validate the calculated virtual water flow rate, the water flow data were measured and collected using an ultrasonic meter, which was installed to a water pipe as shown in the right photo in Figure 9.
nexus analysis to substitute virtual water (water contained in produced
Expressed in terms of export opportunity costs, more than 45 Million TND a year is spent subsidising virtual water exported along with the olive oil exports.
Direct water consumption in the UK is about 145 litres per person per day, but the report raises concerns that we rely on too much "virtual water" embodied in the food, clothes and goods we import.
Likewise, individuals determined to dip their toes into the virtual water should also be aware of the risks and volatility involved when dealing with cryptocurrencies.
The world needs to use water more efficiently rather than exhausting invisible underground supplies and blindly exporting "virtual water" to avert a global crisis that would undermine food and energy systems, a leading expert warned.