electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum

See electromagnetic radiation.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

electromagnetic spectrum

[i¦lek·trō·mag′ned·ik ′spek·trəm]
(electromagnetism)
The total range of wavelengths or frequencies of electromagnetic radiation, extending from the longest radio waves to the shortest known cosmic rays.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

electromagnetic spectrum

electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
The ordered array of known electromagnetic radiation, extending from the shortest cosmic rays, through gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation, and infrared radiation. It includes microwave and all other wavelengths of radio energy. See the illustration for a more detailed view of this spectrum.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

spectrum

The range of electromagnetic radiation (electromagnetic waves) in our known universe, which includes visible light. The radio spectrum, which includes both licensed and unlicensed frequencies up to 300 GHz has been defined worldwide in three regions: Europe and Northern Asia (Region 1); North and South America (Region 2), and Southern Asia and Australia (Region 3). Some frequency bands are used for the same purpose in all three regions while others differ. See satellite frequency bands and optical bands.

Higher Frequencies
Frequencies above 40 GHz have not been licensed, but are expected to be made available in the future as the technology is developed to transmit at these smaller wavelengths (higher frequencies). The spectrum can be viewed in meticulous detail from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) by visiting www.fcc.gov/oet/spectrum and www.ntia.doc.gov/osmhome/osmhome.html. See electromagnetic radiation and wave.

Should Airwaves Be Licensed?


There is a great deal of controversy over the licensing of frequencies. In Kevin Werbach's very educational white paper, "Radio Revolution," the author says an artificial scarcity has been created because policy makers do not understand the technology. He states that many believe the traditional policy of dividing the airwaves into licensed bands now impedes progress because today's radio technologies allow for much more sharing of the spectrum than ever before. The old notion that radio waves interfere with and cancel each other is a false one. Waves just mix together and become more difficult to differentiate, but modern electronics can, in fact, separate them.

To obtain a copy of this insightful report written in 2003, as well as other related articles, visit Werbach's website at www.werbach.com. See smart radio.


Visible Light
Our eyes perceive a tiny sliver of the electromagnetic spectrum. The wavelengths from (approximately) 400 to 750 nanometers provide us with our physical view of the universe.





Visible Light
Our eyes perceive a tiny sliver of the electromagnetic spectrum. The wavelengths from (approximately) 400 to 750 nanometers provide us with our physical view of the universe.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the near infrared range (NIR, 789nm-2500nm), in which there are greater thermal effects compared to those for the visible light spectrum or for ultraviolet rays, transmittance gradually decreases and, at the range of 1800 nm and over, transmittance is nearly zero, and light is either absorbed or reflected.
Why include white, because that's the "color" that a prism refracts into the visible light spectrum? The answers to these questions are utterly irrelevant.
This economical, easy-to-use camera allows researchers to visualize events that are difficult to see in the visible light spectrum. This infrared contrast imaging (IRCI) technology permits quantitative assessment and viewing of biological events that, until now, have relied on subjective observations.
As the more advanced concepts of transformation optics are still being heavily investigated, Hammond explained that the area closest to development is sub-wavelength imaging, or the ability to see tiny particles in the visible light spectrum.
Each colour found in the visible light spectrum has its own frequency or vibration and each frequency has a specific energy and nutritive effect.
* Loctite Visible Light Cure technology, from Henkel Corp., relies solely upon the visible light spectrum to deliver safe, efficient, immediate cure for a broad array of medical device assembly applications.
turns that vision into reality with Loctite Visible Light Cure technology, which relies solely upon the visible light spectrum to deliver safe, efficient, and immediate cure for a broad array of assembly applications.
Users save time with a one-step calibration of the full spectrum, and the complete visible light spectrum, 380-950 nm, can be collected in a fraction of a second with a resolution of 2 nm.
Existing technology has given us solution-processible, light-sensitive materials that have made large, low-cost solar cells, displays, and sensors possible, but these materials have so far only worked in the visible light spectrum, says Sargent.
However, there was no significant difference between the scattering coefficients throughout the visible light spectrum (p = 0.8843).
Color is one of the most important identifying characteristics of minerals--virtually all possible colors of the visible light spectrum occur.
It is coated on both sides using Optimum[TM] technology, which maximizes the transmission of acrylic substrates over the visible light spectrum. Combined with an abrasion resistant finish and hard-coated surface, it is suitable for museum, private and corporate collections, according to company officials.

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