visible spectrum

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visible spectrum

[′viz·ə·bəl ′spek·trəm]
(spectroscopy)
The range of wavelengths of visible radiation.
A display or graph of the intensity of visible radiation emitted or absorbed by a material as a function of wavelength or some related parameter.
References in periodicals archive ?
These groups had a great influence on the processes of photocatalysis, both in the oxidation process of organic compounds and in the photoreduction of C[O.sub.2], not only increasing the absorption of the radiation in the visible region but also providing an effective separation of photo-generated charges.
The most influential bands used to split the observations at the root nodes were located in the visible region (350-700 nm) more specifically at 694 nm, 661 nm, and 689 nm for the low, medium, and high infestation levels, respectively (Figure 5).
Such value is comparable with those found in the visible region for several metals and higher than those of Ag and Au nanostructures in the UV region [7, 93].
The absorption band at 346-392 nm in the UV region was attributed to the [pi]-[[pi].sup.*] transition and another strong absorption band at 489-494 nm in the visible region was due to the [pi]-[[pi].sup.*] transition [37].
The results showed that the transmittance of the film was near 45% in the visible region. The low transmittance is due to the hydroxide species remaining in the film and the number of immersions (12) in the solution to get the film.
The reflectance in the visible region depends largely on two factors: the absorbance of light by the pigment and the scattering of light by the pigment.
0 wt% Ti[O.sub.2] thin film showed high transparency in the visible region and decreased sharply at the UV region but dropped steadily towards the NIR.
The reflectance showed a gradual decreasing trend from F-1 to F-3 in the visible region (Fig.
(4) The presence of the doping ions within the titania structures produces electronic mid-gap states and determines a significant absorption shift to the visible region as compared to undoped Ti[O.sub.2]NPs.
Metals possess SPR in visible region due to free electrons, which give such intense colors.