Center

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center,

in politics, a party following a middle course. The term was first used in France in 1789, when the moderates of the National Assembly sat in the center of the hall. It can refer to a separate party in a political system, e.g., the Catholic Center party of imperial and Weimar Germany, or to the middle group of a party consisting of several ideological factions.

Center

 

in machine building, a device used to position a work-piece or mandrel on lathes, rotary grinders, and other machine tools, as well as on checking and measurement instruments.

One end of a center has a working conical surface with a vertex angle of 60° or 90°; the other has a shank with a shallow cone used to secure the center in the headstock spindle or tailstock spindle, which is an axially adjustable sleeve. If it is necessary to bore the end face of a workpiece, an opening is provided on the dead center so that a cutting tool may protrude. Machining of hollow workpieces calls for larger-diameter centers in the shape of truncated cones that fit into a conical, chamfered hole in the workpiece. Live centers, which are set in the spindle of the machine tool, have serrations on a conical working surface to transmit motion to the workpiece. In order to prevent slippage of the workpiece at higher machine speeds, the dead center may be replaced with a live center running on roller bearings. Centers are fabricated from hardened steel.


Center

 

in mathematics. (1) A point O is said to be the center of symmetry of a geometric configuration if for every point A of the configuration there is another point A′ of the configuration such that O is the midpoint of the line joining A and A′. A curve or surface that has such a center is said to be central. The circle, ellipse, and hyperbola are the simplest examples of central curves, and the sphere, ellipsoid, and hyperboloid (of one or two sheets) are the simplest examples of central surfaces. It is possible for a configuration to have infinitely many centers of symmetry; for example, the centers of symmetry of a configuration consisting of two parallel lines lie on the line equidistant from the two given lines. (See alsoSYMMETRY.)

Figure 1

(2) The center of similitude of radially related configurations is the point S at which lines joining corresponding points of the configurations intersect (Figure 1).

Figure 2

(3) If all integral curves in the neighborhood of a singular point of a differential equation are closed and enclose the singular point, that point is said to be a center (Figure 2). Centers belong to the class of singular points whose character generally is not preserved when small changes are made in the right-hand side of the equation.

center

[′sen·tər]
(industrial engineering)
A manufacturing unit containing a number of interconnected cells.
(mathematics)
The point that is equidistant from all the points on a circle or sphere.
The point (if it exists) about which a curve (such as a circle, ellipse, or hyperbola) is symmetrical.
The point (if it exists) about which a surface (such as a sphere, ellipsoid, or hyperboloid) is symmetrical.
For a regular polygon, the center of its circumscribed circle.
The subgroup consisting of all elements that commute with all other elements in a given group.
The subring consisting of all elements a such that ax = xa for all x in a given ring.
(optics)
To adjust the components of an optical system so that their centers of curvature lie on a common optical axis. Also known as square-on.
(statistics)
For a distribution, the expected value of any random variable which has the distribution.

center

1. The center ply in plywood.
2. The core in a laminated construction.
3. Centering.
4. The center about which an arc of a circle is drawn, equidistant from all points on the arc.

centre

(US), center
1. Geometry
a. the midpoint of any line or figure, esp the point within a circle or sphere that is equidistant from any point on the circumference or surface
b. the point within a body through which a specified force may be considered to act, such as the centre of gravity
2. the point, axis, or pivot about which a body rotates
3. Politics
a. a political party or group favouring moderation, esp the moderate members of a legislative assembly
b. (as modifier): a Centre-Left alliance
4. Physiol any part of the central nervous system that regulates a specific function
5. a bar with a conical point upon which a workpiece or part may be turned or ground
6. a punch mark or small conical hole in a part to be drilled, which enables the point of the drill to be located accurately
7. Basketball
a. the position of a player who jumps for the ball at the start of play
b. the player in this position
8. Archery
a. the ring around the bull's eye
b. a shot that hits this ring
References in periodicals archive ?
IN THE YEARS FOLLOWING KENNEDYS assassination it became painfully clear that the Vital Center could not hold.
Schlesinger becomes fully embroiled in the battle to fend off both Stalinism and the reprehensible attempt by the American right to exploit the Cold War for its own purposes, a battle that culminates in the publication of what may well prove to be his most important work, The Vital Center, at the age of just thirty-one.
Schlesinger took to stigmatizing Sidney Hook, his former ally in the liberal anti-Communist crusade of The Vital Center period, as the wrong kind of anti-Communist.
The "vital center" of American politics is not halfway between Left and Right: It's a new spectrum entirely.
In the first pages of The Vital Center, Schlesinger stressed the need for dynamic leadership in a democracy:
The Vital Center goes on about all the things government might do, and all the corresponding difficulties it needs to keep in mind when trying them.
After its expulsion from Poland in 1660, Socinianism found a new and vital center among the Dutch, whose intellectual and mercantile reach provided a network for spreading Socinian books and ideas.
In this context of social and political change, citizens, government, business, and cultural agents attempted almost desperately to cling to a notion of consensus around a "vital center." Cast in a variety of contexts--ideological, economic and cultural--the key element was a notion of consensus across the political spectrum, fueled by unparalleled consumer power, uniting disparate former ideological combatants into a centrist coalition against the extremist forces of communism and fascism.
Taft and others on the Right supported, if grudgingly, intervention in Korea in 1950 and the construction of the national security state; organized labor and mainstream civil-rights organizations positioned themselves within "vital center" liberalism.
old-style Republicans and conservatives, but rather the liberals who comprised what they liked to call the 'vital center."'
"Development that preserves community character, housing that serves a range of income groups, a vital center and improved transportation will lead to a better quality of life for all our citizens."