Vitallium


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vitallium

 

a cobalt alloy consisting of 0.2-0.35 percent C, 1.5-3.5 percent Ni, 25-30 percent Cr, 4.5-6.5 percent Mo, up to 2 percent Fe, 0.3 percent Mn, and 0.6 percent Si. VitalHum is used as a cast heat-resistant material for small and medium (up to 20-25 kg) castings of components of gas turbines (including moving blades), which are used at temperatures up to 800° C.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Between 1951 and 1952, resin (Boron, Sevin, Judet) and vitallium (Krueger) prostheses were produced, while Charles S Neer II developed the modern monoblock (single piece) prosthesis.
ilk kez 1939 yilinda metal kartsimi olan Vitallium adinda bir testis protezi implante edilmis ve 1941 yilinda yayin1anmistir.
As an alternative to titanium, vitallium (alloy of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum) has been tried extensively since the 1970s [115].
calvarial bone or iliac crest can be used for accretion of the articular eminence.8 Numerous materials have also been utilized to enhance the eminence like vitallium mesh implants, L-shaped pins, and mini implants.8,9 The downward displacement of zygomatic arch acts by hindering the path of condylar translation, described by Mayer in 1933.
Use of Moore self-locking Vitallium prosthesis in acute fractures of the femoral neck.
He only resurfaced the patella and used a screw-on Vitallium patellar shell.
As scientific experimentation on tissue biocompatibility and bone material interaction continued, Vitallium (cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy) was proposed by Venable, Strock and Beach and became the first long-term successful implant material in 1930's [3,5].
The idea of using screws fixed to bone to obtain absolute anchorage goes back to 1945, when Gainsforth and Higley (12) placed vitallium screws in the ascending ramus of 6 dogs to retract their canines.
This was initially effective, but the glass proved too fragile and was replaced by Pyrex and then, in 1938, by vitallium. By 1947 he had performed this procedure in over 500 patients.
The alloplastic materials like vitallium, tantalum, teflon, acrylic and silastic or silicone rubber have also been used from time to time.