Vitellophages

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vitellophages

 

cells that remain in the yolk during sur-face fission of the eggs of insects, crustaceans, and arachnids. Vitellophages do not participate in building the body of the future embryo. It is theorized that under their influence the yolk is fragmented and reabsorbed during later stages of development.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These invasive cells have been described as vitellophages, with some function in the formation of the midgut (Brooks and Herrick.
During the mid- to late stages of embryogenesis, some yolk nuclei probably function as vitellophages. After hatching, the residual yolk is incorporated into the developing midgut and digestive diverticulum, a network of blind-end caeca that extends throughout the prosoma.
We speculate that during embryogenesis of the blue crab, proteases and lipases in vitellophages hydrolyze lipovitellin to amino acids and fatty acids, which the cuboidal cells then use to assemble LpI.