Vladimir-Volyn Principality

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vladimir-Volyn Principality

 

a feudal Russian principality in the area of the upper and middle courses of the Bug River and the right tributaries of the Pripiat’ River. The principality was formed at the end of the tenth century in the land of the Volynians and became part of Kievan Rus’. The first ruler of the Vladimir-Volyn Principality was the son of Vladimir Sviatoslavich-Vsevolod. At the Liubech assembly of princes (1097), Prince David Igorevich was given the principality. According to a decision of the Vitichev assembly (1100), it was given to Prince Sviatopolk Iziaslavich. In 1118, Vladimir Monomakh seized it. He put his son Andrei on the throne until 1134, when Iziaslav Mstislavich became prince (1134-54). His sons divided the principality between them. In 1154 it became completely isolated from Kiev. Iziaslav’s grandson, Roman Mstislavich (1170-1205), achieved the strengthening of the prince’s power in the struggle against the prominent feudal lords of Volyn. In 1199, Roman Mstislavich united the Galician and Volynian lands to form the Galician-Volynian Principality.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.