Vladimirka


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vladimirka

 

the popular name for the route that existed in the 19th and early 20th centuries along which arrestees were sent from Moscow through Vladimir to Siberia. The term was used mainly in reference to the part of the route between Moscow and Vladimir. Thousands of political prisoners traveled along the Vladimirka. In 1919 the Vladimir highway in Moscow was renamed “the highway of the Zealots” in memory of the revolutionaries. The Vladimirka was frequently depicted in works of literature and art—for example, folk songs, the verses of N. A. Nekrasov, and I. I. Levitan’s painting.

REFERENCE

Gernet, M. N. Istoriia tsarskoi tiur’my, 3rd ed., vol. 2. Moscow, 1961.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) The Vladimirka, or the Great Siberian Highway, was in reality nothing more than a narrow dirt track.
His Evening Bells (1892) shows a group of religious buildings, the sound of whose bells would often ring out across the countryside, reflected in a wide river; his Vladimirka Road (1892) portrayed the infamous road trodden by generations of prisoners on their way to Siberia; in his Above Eternal Rest (1893-94), immense storm clouds hang above a diminutive church standing precariously on a small spit of land, surrounded by the swirling waters of a mighty river in spate.
Even Levitan's one great 'political' work, 'Vladimirka' (the Vladimir Highway, trodden by many eastbound exiles) has this feature, as well as a crossroads with a pilgrim and a shrine.
Particular places attracted Levitan for their associative potential: The Vladimirka Road (1892), representing the route taken by political prisoners, among them Dostoevsky, bound for Siberia; or Deep Waters (1892) in which a young pregnant girl was reputed to have drowned herself.