Vocative Form

Vocative Form

 

a special form of nouns that indicates the person or, less frequently, the object being addressed. Examples include the Lithuanian vyre (from vyras, “fine fellow”), the Lak zuzalai (from zuzala, “worker”), and the Bulgarian iunache (from iunak, “fine fellow”). In Russian there are vestiges of the vocative form, such as bozhe (from bog, “god”), druzhe (from drug, “friend”), and otche (from otets, “father”). Special popular forms are used in the vocative, such as “Nad”‘ (for Nadia) and “Serezh” (for Serezha). Some words and phrases that are not actually in the vocative form are used to express a vocative meaning; they are not part of a sentence and are isolated from it syntactically. An example is Proshchai, svobodnaia stikhiia! (“Farewell, free element!”).

References in periodicals archive ?
and nouns like boy, girl, kid, lad(die), lass(ie), man, quean and woman, and which may be separated by a comma (thus functioning independently) or may occur together as one syntactic unit in the same vocative form.
What is interesting, however, is the way in which these nouns appear to be used in relatively marked pragmatic contexts, in which their use as a vocative form appears to add disparaging or endearing values -precisely the kind of values that, as we saw above, diminutive forms may also express.
It is this structure of the 'to come' that is unmistakable in the vocative form of Aristotle's 'O my friends, there is no friend'.
Such statement is right in philological terms, in as much as the Italian Jesuit realized that padme is a vocative form of padma, although he did not venture to provide a translation of the spell.
33% of cases it follows a vocative form of a noun, usually a personal name, the choice of reporting verbs is limited to seggen (54.
Furthermore, although his older beach companion "Jaschiu" (Mann's phonetic spelling of "Jasio," the vocative form of the name "Jas") also existed, and was called Jan Fudakowski, he was in reality Adzio's junior by a few months and therefore neither the "sturdy lad with brilliantined black hair" of the novella nor, afortiori, the muscular hunk, visibly in his late teens or even early twenties, of the film that Luchino Visconti adapted from the book in 1971.
The vocative form is used with frequent appeals by name to the writer's friend "Molly.
In the fourth verse of Kyrie 4, vivifice cannot be translated as the imperative "vivify" (which would have been vivifica), but rather must be read as the vocative form of the noun vivificus ("life-giving" or "life-giver").
Avoidance of formal co-incidence is also invoked to explain the absence of a vocative form of [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], a form which would be identical with the accusative case [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (synt.
Note that singular oblique and vocative forms of Urdu noun b@cha 'child' are identical to its plural nominative form.
vocative forms with zero endings ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
However, though marked by vocative forms, apostrophe is not dialogue, for even if the addressee is part of the orator's audience and thus can "hear" the apostrophe, conventionally the addressee does not reply.