volatilization

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volatilization

[‚väl·əd·əl·ə′zā·shən]
(thermodynamics)
The conversion of a chemical substance from a liquid or solid state to a gaseous or vapor state by the application of heat, by reducing pressure, or by a combination of these processes. Also known as vaporization.
References in periodicals archive ?
The objectives of this work were to (1) verify whether urea+S can mitigate N[H.sub.3]-N volatilisation compared with conventional N fertilisers, and (2) evaluate the efficiency of N and S sources in terms of plant nutrition, yield components, and grain yield (GY) for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crops grown in three different soil textures.
3), so the N unaccounted for was probably lost in gaseous form, either as N[H.sub.3] gas through volatilisation or [N.sub.2]O and/or [N.sub.2] gases through denitrification.
A delay in urea hydrolysis by the action of NBPT has the potential not only to minimise the risk of N losses via N[H.sub.3] volatilisation from soil, but also to improve the plant bioavailability of urea-derived N (Dawar et al.
As pointed out above gaseous emissions of nitrogen via ammonia volatilisation, nitrification, and denitrification are the dominant mechanisms for the loss of fertiliser nitrogen from Australian agroecosystems.
Snelgrove, who pointed out that arsenic might also contribute to gold losses through volatilisation, while J.C.
risk of heightened volatilisation of ammonia when using some nitrification inhibitors), which underscores the need for studies that simultaneously measure volatilisation, leaching and [N.sub.2]O emissions.
The control and urea-treated soil was sampled immediately after treatment application (Day 0), and days 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 (when nitrogen loss via volatilisation had decreased to <0.5% of applied N per day), Day 16, and Day 32 (when nitrification was expected to be complete).
Although urease inhibitors are effective at decreasing N[H.sub.3] volatilisation by slowing the rate of urea hydrolysis and reducing the risk of elevated pH that drives N[H.sub.3] formation, their impact can be variable due to the influence of climatic conditions, soil type, and land use on N[H.sub.3] volatilisation.
Predicting volatilisation from the literature to calculate plant-available N is difficult because of the variability in estimates and measurements (Robinson and Polglase 2000), and/or the lack of data (Chambers 1996).
Notably, the application of 3.8 mm of water within one day of urea application, a rate of 'rainfall' not expected to reduce N[H.sub.3] volatilisation, resulted in a measured N[H.sub.3] loss in the range of 38 to 41% of N applied (Holcomb et al.
The potential for urea hydrolysis to affect a soil's CEC and subsequent N[H.sub.3] volatilisation could be the focus of a separate independent study using the rapid SIFT-MS measurement technique.
urea), when surface-applied, are susceptible to loss of ammonia to the atmosphere via the process of volatilisation (Freney et al.