Zeitgeist

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Google Zeitgeist

The vast knowledge Google accumulates about the interests of the human race, which is based on the billions of things people search for on Google. "Zeitgeist" is German for "spirit of the times" (Zeit = time; geist = spirit, ghost), and Google is said to know the Zeitgeist of the world better than any other organization. See big data.
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Zeitgeist

(German) the spirit of a particular age. This is a term particularly employed in the study of 19th-century romanticism, and denotes the essential beliefs and feelings of a particular epoch. See also DILTHEY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
This idea of different cultures, separate from or supplement to a unified human nature, is the forerunner of Savigny and his Volksgeist.
793), que no es mas que el Volksgeist espanol que habita en el interior de cada individuo.
Franz Boas and the Humboldtian Tradition: From Volksgeist and Nationalcharakter to an Anthropological Concept of Culture.
No espirito do romantismo, o historicismo reagia ao universalismo abstrato das teorias racionalistas do direito procurando enfatizar, com a ideia de Volksgeist (espirito do povo), as idiossincrasias nacionais na construcao de institutos juridicos.
(35) One merely needs to contrast Susman's sober account of Hasidic mysticism as a product of Judaism's fusion with foreign cultures to Buber's ecstatic celebration of Hasidism, which he saw as a manifestation of an authentic Jewish Volksgeist, in order to grasp Susman's ideological quarrel with cultural Zionism.
This approach has two sides to it: on the one hand, Rohde insists that the novel is free of foreign cultural elements, notably, of the Near East, but rather represents 'the disposition of the Greek national spirit' (die Disposition des griechischen Volksgeist) (32)--in other words, a purely Hellenic invention born out of its Greek literary antecedents and composed in strong resistance to both Oriental and Roman influences.
In contrast, traditional music, 'folk music' as people would have called it at the time (what according to the Romantics would express the Volksgeist, that is, the quintessential ethnic and spiritual character of a people aspiring to be recognized as a nation) was in Italy uniquely unsuitable for that purpose.
Like the clergy who helped spawn the French Revolution, Strehle says that the liberal theology and biblical criticism that swept over Germany in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries ultimately helped pave the way for Nazism by undermining the Judeo-Christian basis of Western civilization and stimulating the spirit of German Volksgeist (that is, exultation of an extreme, twisted nationalism and sense of ethno-national supremacy).