Volscians


Also found in: Dictionary.

Volscians

(vŏl`shəns) or

Volsci

(vŏl`sī), people of ancient Italy. They occupied the country SE of the Alban Hills. They were early opponents of the Romans and Latins. The story of CoriolanusCoriolanus
(Gnaeus Marcius Coriolanus) , Roman patrician. He is said to have derived his name from the capture of the Volscian city Corioli. According to legend he was expelled from Rome because he demanded the abolition of the people's tribunate in return for distributing state
..... Click the link for more information.
, a Roman who led the Volscians against Rome, only to turn back at the last minute and be put to death by the Volscians, is probably more legend than truth. Warfare apparently continued from the 6th cent. B.C. until the 4th cent. B.C., when the Volscians were conquered and Romanized.

Volscians

 

one of the ancient tribes of central Italy, probably related to the Umbrians. In the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. they carried on a stubborn battle against Rome; in 338 B.C. they were subdued by the Romans.

References in periodicals archive ?
He is given the honorific name "Coriolanus" after he conquers the Volscian city Corioles in a single-handed attack.
Aufidius addresses his late ally as Caius Martius in the last lines of the play (and the film) to remind the present Volscians of the heinous role he had in the death of the people of Corioles and urges them to murder him immediately.
(8.) "Camilla virgo volscor regina in battaglia excessi el foeminil modo ma pur vincendo venus e cupido e vergine stando acquistai piu lodo." ("Camilla, virgin queen of the Volscians, exceeded the ways of women in battle but acquired more praise through vanquishing Venus and Cupid and remaining virginal" trans, by Franklin).
So far as we can tell, the only benefit he's brought to the Volscians is knowledge of the Roman defenses--the kind of information any high-placed traitor could bring.
Spitting out Shakespeare's speeches and soliloquys with visceral relish, Fiennes elaborates Martius' primordial code: he lives to kill and the man he most yearns to kill is his loathed enemy, Volscian leader Tullus Aufidius (Butler).
unaccomplished gesture of kindness toward the nameless Volscian man who
Coriolanus "works with London perceptions of Anglo-Scottish difference in the polarity that it establishes between the fractious, politically complex world of Rome and the more archaic, aristocratic, and militaristic milieu of the Volscians" (18).
The news of the Volscians' advance upon Rome came via cell phone messages, and the sense of panic in Menenius and Cominius caused by news of Coriolanus's league with Aufidius heralded Williamson's brilliant conclusion to the play.
Beginning the play as Caius Martius, arrogant son of Volumnia, he earns the name Coriolanus after leading the Roman army to victory over the Volscians.
He finds employment there, leading the Volscians, whom he recently humbled in the corpse-littered streets of their city, to the very walls of his own.
With the exception, centuries before, of the treason of Coriolanus and his defection to Rome's sworn enemies, the Volscians, Rome had always managed to solve her internal disputes without resort to violence or betrayal.
He's suitably bloodthirsty as needed (in Kent's boldly drawn conception, Fiennes looks spookily like Carrie at the prom during the Romans' initial battles with the Volscians), but there is a vivid, quixotic nobility in this warrior's pride, and his disdain for public approbation seems to stem from an authentic sensitivity rather than simple churlishness.