Volsunga Saga

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Volsunga Saga

cycle of Scandinavian legends, major source of Niebelungenlied. [Scand. Lit.: Benét, 1064]
See: Epic
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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As previously stated, the guardian of the treasure may typically be thought as a dragon, as it is in The Hobbit, or in Beowulf, or in the Volsunga Saga, but it could also be a different sort of uncanny or malevolent creature, from the genie of the Chinese legend of the cave Kwang-sio-foo to the Devil himself in some Abruzzo stories.
A lifetime of reading Beowulf and Volsunga Saga equipped Tolkien to employ Frye's higher modes with particular skill.
"Variations on Volsunga Saga" ("Tilbrygoi vio Volsungasogu") is a diary entry Johannessen wrote after hearing the news of Borges's death.
Muller gives full accounts of the Scandinavian and Germanic sources for the Ring cycle with generous extracts from the Eddas, Thidreks Saga, Volsunga Saga, and the Nibelungenlied, and appends good explanatory material.
"The Role of Women in Anglo-Saxon Culture: Hildeburh in Beowulf and a Curious Counterpart in the Volsunga Saga." English Language Notes 32.1 (Sept.
Although the codex is missing several pages, some of the lost poems were preserved in prose form in the Volsunga saga.
In Volsunga saga, when he hears of the approach of an enemy army under Alf, Sigmundr konungr ...
It plays with ideas and attitudes we can see in Gilgamesh, but also in other orally-based epics: Homer's Iliad, the Icelandic Volsunga Saga, the German Niebelungenlied, the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf, the French Chanson de Roland, and the Spanish El Cid.
Although based on Scandinavian legends as told in the poetic Edda and the Volsunga Saga, it draws further on German legend and omits much of the supernatural material; Siegfried, for instance, is no longer a descendant of the Scandinavian god Odin but rather the son of the king of the Netherlands and a typical hero of medieval romance.
As in her previous volume, she draws examples from a wide variety of cultures, here including the Rig Veda and Indo-European myth, Greek traditions such as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and the myth of Jason and the Argonauts, Arthurian legend, the Norse Volsunga Saga, Beowulf, the Epic of Gilgamesh, and African, Native American, Inuit, and Slav myth (among others).
69) before he succumbed to a lust for gold and power--greater significance than Regin had in his Urtext, the Volsunga Saga.