Vad

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VAD

[vad or ‚vē‚ā′dē]

Vad

 

(Bolshoi Vad), a river in Penza Oblast, RSFSR, and the Mordvinian ASSR, a left tributary of the Moksha River (Oka basin). Length, 222 km; basin area, 6,500 sq km. It arises from a group of springs and flows between sloping banks which are predominantly marshy or forested. The average yearly flow on its upper reaches (at Avdalovo) is 7.5 cu m per sec. It is floatable during its periods of greatest flow.

VAD

(1) (Value Added Dealer) See VAR.

(2) (Voice Activated Dialing) Dialing a phone by speaking the names or numbers. VAD is a common capability on smartphones.

(3) (Voice Activity Detection) An algorithm that determines when an audio signal is a human's voice. VAD is used in voice over IP (VoIP) and speech recognition systems in order to not waste computer processing cycles if the sound is not human speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) referred to a unit providing field nursing services, mainly in hospital, in Canada, the UK, and other countries in the British Empire.
| Monday's service of dedication at Alrewas and (below) First World War Voluntary Aid Detachment nurses
Nurses, both trained and the newly-recruited members of the Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) - mostly young ladies from the middle classes who wanted to do more than simply roll bandages - worked in hospitals in France and Flanders, including the Liverpool Merchants Mobile Hospital.
In the summer of 1915, aged 21, Vera had delayed her English literature degree at Somerville College, Oxford, to become a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse tending to wounded servicemen.
Efforts varied from privately funding and operating their own women's hospitals located near battle zones to joining Voluntary Aid Detachment units or enrolling with auxiliary nursing services such as Red Cross hospitals.
The last scenes are post-battle - the delivery of a dreaded telegram and a fiercely disciplined nurse telling us volunteers of the Voluntary Aid Detachment (as we have become) about triage, the process of sorting the treatable from those beyond medical help.
It's Matron, Mrs A H Roberts, was the only professional nurse working with Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurses who were comprised of mainly married women with some single women of independent means.
The commanding officer of the military establishment was Lt Colonel A Burns Gemmel and he led a team that would eventually include almost 40 officers, 170 trained nurses, 340 Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurses and 325 NCOs and men.
A Voluntary Aid Detachment tent in The Town was "recruiting" field nurses, offering children the chance to try some first aid techniques - with slings, splints and bandage rolling - while the Band Hall in The Pit Village was commandeered by a group of ladies knitting woollens for the troops while telling stories about local soldiers.
In the summer of 1915 aged 21 Vera had delayed her English literature degree at Somerville College, Oxford, to become a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse tending to wounded servicemen.
During the First World War, he gave Normanhurst House to be used as a Voluntary Aid Detachment hospital by the Red Cross to care for the wounded.

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