Vorkuta


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Related to Vorkuta: Norilsk, gulag

Vorkuta

(vərko͞otä`), city (2010 pop. 70,548), Komi Republic, NE European Russia, above the Arctic Circle. It is the industrial center of the Pechora coal basin. Founded in 1932 as the site of large Soviet forced-labor camps, Vorkuta became a city in 1942. Some of the camps were still being used in the 1980s, although they were reportedly dissolved after Stalin's death. Many of the area's coal mines closed during the 1990s, leading to the exodus of a third of the inhabitants.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vorkuta

 

a city in the Komi ASSR. It is located 160 km north of the Arctic Circle, in the Bol’shaia Zemlia tundra, on the Vorkuta River. It has a railroad station. Population, 90,000 (1970). Vorkuta is a major center of coal extraction in the Pechora Coal Basin. Industry is represented by a lumber combine, machine plants, machine-repair plants, and building-materials plants (cement, housing construction, reinforced-concrete products, brick). There is a poultry farm. The city has a nursery for decorative plants and trees and a large hothouse farm. Education and cultural institutions include the Pechora Coal Scientific Research Institute, a branch of the Leningrad Mining Institute, a mining technicum, a medical school, drama and puppet theaters, and a television station. Vorkuta was founded in 1931 in connection with the beginning of coal extraction. It was a settlement prior to becoming a city in 1943. On Dec. 28, 1970, the city was awarded the Order of the Red Banner of Labor.

REFERENCE

Ushpik, N. G. Vorkuta. Syktykvar, 1964.

Vorkuta

 

a river in Nenets National Okrug; Arkhangelsk Oblast, RSFSR; and the Komi ASSR. Right tributary of the Usa River (Pechora basin). Length, 182 km. Basin area, 4,550 sq km. Its source is in the spurs of the Northern Urals, in the Bol’shoe Vorkuta-Khasyrei-Ty Lake. The Vorkuta basin has 2,000 lakes and many swamps. The river is fed by snow and rain. The mean annual discharge in the middle course is 43.4 cu m per sec. The river freezes in the middle of October, and the ice breaks up between late May and early June. The Vorkuta is used to supply water to the Vorkuta coal fields. The city of Vorkuta is located on the river.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Soviet government decided to exploit a new coal basin in the far north near the town of Vorkuta and were in the process of sending thousands of Gulag prisoners there.
This work examines the skinhead subculture in the post-industrial city of Vorkuta, Russia.
"[...] meaning that, while Romanians were freezing to death at Stalingrad or as prisoners in Siberia or Vorkuta, the Jews were taken out to clean the snow on Victoriei Avenue".
It has also unveiled plans to introduce base stations in Vorkuta, Usinsk and Pechora in the Komi Republic region.
CASE STUDIES OF THE INTRODUCTION OF WAGES--NORILSK AND VORKUTA
Were it not for writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn we might never know of Soviet death camps like Magadan, Kolyma and Vorkuta. Movie after movie appears about Nazi evil, while the evil of the Soviet era vanishes from view or dissolves into nostalgia.
In an Alice Through the Looking Glass way, the Gulag reflected the communist system as a whole: From the gold mines of Vorkuta to the collective farm camps of Uzbekistan to the prisoner-operated Krasnoyarsk nuclear power plants, a beautiful, rationally planned economic ideal was inevitably subverted by chaotic reality.
Applebaum as the vast network of labor camps that were once scattered across the length and breadth of the Soviet Union, from the islands of the White Sea to the shores of the Black Sea, from the Arctic Circle to the plains of central Asia, from Murmansk to Vorkuta to Kazakhstan, from central Moscow to the Leningrad suburbs.
A recent analysis of political action by coal miners in Vorkuta, a Russian arctic city, at the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union, offers a typical structuralist overgeneralization: "Living in secluded communities, subject to horrific working conditions but with considerable workplace autonomy, miners throughout the world are renowned for their radicalism and militance." (71) A detailed study of coal strikes in Britain, 1889-1966, by Roy Church and Quentin Outram, however, shows that structural factors such as colliery seclusion and workplace size provide a very partial guide to understanding strike patterns in the British coal industry.