Vulgar Latin


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Related to Vulgar Latin: Romantic Languages

Vulgar Latin,

vernacular form of the Latin languageLatin language,
member of the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. Latin was first encountered in ancient times as the language of Latium, the region of central Italy in which Rome is located (see Italic languages).
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 spoken in ancient Rome and the Roman Empire, as distinguished from classical or literary Latin. Vulgar Latin, rather than classical Latin, is the true parent of the individual Romance languagesRomance languages,
group of languages belonging to the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Italic languages). Also called Romanic, they are spoken by about 670 million people in many parts of the world, but chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
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Vulgar Latin

 

popular Latin (Latin sermo vulgaris, colloquial speech), traditional term used to designate the living language of the masses of the people in the Roman Empire (beginning in the third to second century B.C.). Cicero, Quintillian, and others made the distinction between Vulgar Latin and literary Latin (sermo latina and lingua latino). During the fall of the Roman Empire in the.fourth and fifth centuries the single Latin language gradually underwent a process of differentiation. As a result of political and social changes the living Latin speech began to penetrate all areas of life. Because of the absence of political and cultural contact, the so-called popular Latin developed in different ways in various parts of the former Roman Empire, thus leading to the formation of the independent Romance languages in the ninth century.

Vulgar Latin

any of the dialects of Latin spoken in the Roman Empire other than classical Latin. The Romance languages developed from them
References in periodicals archive ?
Jozsef Herman's 1967 study, Le latin vulgaire, is the primary introductory study of Vulgar Latin.
Their Vulgar Latin imprinted itself on the local vernacular, and by the fifth century a.
The translation process is complicated by the complex syntax and rich vocabulary of late Latin, as well as by the fusion of patristic and vulgar Latin with Italian and latinized Greek terms and the appearance of Latin terms with Greek endings.
Suggested points of origin, from which a route to English verse might be traced, have included Persian, Ancient Chinese, Celtic, Arabic, Old Norse, and Vulgar Latin.
It is worth pointing out that the origin of the modern Italian conditional, -ei, was an alternative development in which the infinitive fused with the perfect of the verb 'to have' (CANTARE + HABUI > canterei) and that these conditional forms, like the future tense, were the result of the process of grammaticalization in vulgar Latin.
The French call a witch 'sorciere' (masculine 'sorcier') derived from Vulgar Latin sortiarius (fortune-teller).
The notebook, a book of notes, caern, the pocket version probably rather than the larger-sheeted cayer or quaer (from the vulgar Latin quaternio, a cluster of four sheets), not a journal with daily registered entries contextualized and readily situatable historically and geographically when reread months later, entries in fact undated except for the year .