Vulgarisms


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vulgarisms

 

crude words that are unacceptable in standard speech or expressions that are incorrect in form.

Vulgarisms are sometimes introduced into the speech of characters of the text of a literary work as an intentional stylistic element in order to convey a certain everyday coloration—for example, “Akh, vam ne khotitsia l’ pod ruchku proitit’sia?” “Moi milyi! Konechno! Khotitsia, khotitsia” (“Ya wanna go for a walk?” “Sure I wanna”; E. Bagritskii). In present-day stylistics the term “popular speech” is used more often than the term “vulgarisms.”

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The paper's top editors judged that in this situation, it was not enough to say merely that an obscenity or a vulgarism had been used.
Mr Thwaite was dismayed by its 'bad grammar, pretentious barbarisms and vulgarisms which sound like stuff produced by third-rate advertising copywriters'.
This term--and not the vulgarisms that Hollywood seeks to cram into every line of every screenplay--is, need one say, the really obscene four-letter word of modern American life.
On the lexical level, we can also point at vulgarisms, which are not often used in literature in this function--to present the unpresentable--but theoretically they can occur in regular language usage.
But what is most striking about the American personae assumed by the stilyagi was that these alternate personalities were built out of vulgarisms. Mind you, this was not vulgarity as only the insane Stalinist cultural apparatus would define it, but a strident, studied vulgarity that made even Western elites grimace when they saw it in their own streets.
(67) According to Stephens and Winkler 1995, 367, both texts contain 'a number of vulgarisms and uncorrected errors in both the prose and the verse sections of the text.'
The character of the Biscayan is most truly drawn, and with his own confused notions of things he speaks of himself in the absurd idiom of his own country, in the second person: "Asi te matas, como estas ahi vizcaino." The angry knight, in the violence of his resentment against Sancho, speaks a leash of languages at once, and styles him ganan, faquin, belitre.(***) It has this in common with ours in Hudibras, that many vulgarisms are here and there scattered throughout the whole, which are seldom used by writers, but frequently in conversation.
In a crisp, breezy, provocative style, peppered with both learned references and pithy vulgarisms, Cahill argues that Jesus still deserves his status as "the Icon of the West." While perfectly aware of modern biblical criticism, Cahill sees no obstacles to making a semi-traditional Christian profession of faith today.
Conversely, in the late nineteenth century RP seems to have adopted some features that had been denounced as vulgarisms. Mugglestone (1995: 194-199) gives evidence that the back variety of /a/, as in grass, path, was resisted in some quarters in the late nineteenth century, as it was of course also a Cockney feature regionalized to the south-east of England; yet, it was finally adopted in RP (except by some RP speakers of northern origin).
But even then, Ruhmkorf went a step beyond Benn's crass physical images -- referring in Ruhmkorf's case to the abysmal postwar years -- in that his range of vocabulary has always included vulgarisms: thus, from Benn's "Hirn und Hode" to Ruhmkorf's "Schlafe und Hosenstall," "Zoten und Zeichen." I suspect Benn would have shied away from an amusing spot-on formulation such as "des Mondes goldener Arsch."
bruLion's strongest voices were Marcin Swietlicki and Jacek Podsiadlo, both of whom rejected poetry's traditional obligations to society in favor of a personal lyricism, and who used colloquial language, vulgarisms, references to everyday objects, and brand names in their poems.
It still surprises me to hear men and women using vulgarisms in public that were once considered the language of gutter trash.