Viazemskii

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Viazemskii

 

a city (prior to 1951, a settlement), the center of Viazemskii Raion, Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR. It has a railroad station 130 km south of Khabarovsk. Population, 18,000 (1970). The city has railroad transport enterprises, a woodworking combine, a timber procurement enterprise, a vegetable cannery, a dairy, a mechanical-repair plant, and a brickworks. There is also a forestry technicum. [5_1797_1]

References in periodicals archive ?
The Moscow Telegraph categorically claimed that writers of "the literary aristocracy"--i.e., Pushkin, Vyazemsky, Delvig, and Zhukovsky--were not national, but "private," expressing the thoughts and moods of just one social group that constituted only a tiny proportion of the population.
Entrusted with the task of drafting a plan to move the German colonists from the Volga to the Caucasus, Prosecutor General of the Russian Empire Prince Vyazemsky produced a report "On Resettling Colonists of the Meadow Side of the Volga to the Line Built between Mozdok and the Azov Sea," which the Empress endorsed by a decree of 27 October, 1778 (10).
[15.] Prince Pyotr Andreyevich Vyazemsky (1792-1878), Russian critic, poet, translator, archivist, and a friend of Mickiewicz.
While Boris Godunov was in progress, Prince Pyotr Vyazemsky forwarded to Pushkin advice from his brother-in-law Nikolai Mikhailovich Karamzin: "He says that in drawing the character of Boris you must bear in mind a wild contradiction between piety and criminal passions....
Vyazemsky, to all intents and purposes her Home Secretary and Finance Minister, worked for her from 1764 to 1792, and when he became too ill to continue, her minister of commerce from 1772 to 1792.
In 1817, Prince Pyotr Vyazemsky, in a discussion of the playwright Ozerov, became the first Russian critic to apply the word romanticesky to a Russian writer.
Petr Vyazemsky mocked the ballad in a letter to Alexander Turgenev, first wondering why the prisoner never made an effort to communicate with the girl ("They would have fallen in love, and I would have killed them in the torments of Tantalus"), and then noting the unnaturalness of the rejection of earthly memory.
Vyazemsky's article "Reflections on the War of 1812," which had been recently published in Russian Archive.