WAC

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WAC

(Women's Army Corps), U.S. army organization created (1942) during World War II to enlist women as auxiliaries for noncombatant duty in the U.S. army. Before 1943 it was known as the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC). Its first director was Oveta Culp HobbyHobby, Oveta Culp,
1905–95, American public official and newspaper publisher, U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare (1953–55), b. Killeen, Tex. She served as parliamentarian of the Texas house of representatives from 1925 to 1931 and from 1939 to 1941.
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. During World War II, WACs served as medical technicians, cartography clerks, secretaries, and the like in the United States and in all the theaters of war. Almost 100,000 had joined the WAC by 1945. Enlistment ended with the war's end, and rapid demobilization followed. But by 1946 the War Dept. asked for reenlistments to meet shortages in army hospitals and personnel centers. In 1948 a bill was passed by Congress formally establishing the WAC within the regular army. The WAC was dissolved in 1978.

Bibliography

See M. E. Treadwell, The Women's Army Corps (1954).

WAC

(Wholesale Applications Community, London and Pleasanton, CA, www.wacapps.net) Founded in 2010, an alliance of carriers, mobile device manufacturers and software companies that promotes common Web-based standards that enable mobile apps to run under different mobile operating systems. WAC uses HTML and a set of programming interfaces (JavaScript APIs) from the BONDI project for developing Widgets (tiny apps) and Web pages. See Tizen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The WACS runs from South Africa to the UK, via Portugal, delivering a total capacity of 5.12 terabits per second.
"We were never bothered,'' Wacs said, recalling the sounds of shop windows smashed and the screams as people were dragged from their homes into custody.
The DA program of the WACS has added over 300 middle-level trained anaesthetists to the overstretched anaesthetic manpower base in anglophone West Africa in the past two decades.
Its network provides connectivity onto the four main subsea fibre systems of Africa; WACS, EASSY, Seacom and SAT3.
Panel members included distinguished members of the culinary community including Rick Moonen (Executive Chef/Owner, RM Seafood); Elisabeth Vallet (Director of Eurpoean Programs, Seafood Choices Alliance); Mats-Eric Nilsson (Author, food writer and investigative journalist); Sanjeev Kapoor (Chairman, Indian Cookery Pvt Ltd); Yen Koh (Executive Chef, Unilever Food Solutions, South East Asia and Singapor); and WACS President Gissur Gudmundsson.
The DWDM network will be extended to the borders of neighboring countries and as a result, operators in Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana are expected to benefit from the higher capacity and improved international connectivity through the 14,900 Km WACS.
WACS is a global network of chefs associations first founded in October, 1928 in Sorbonne, Paris.
While WACs worked long hours beside their male counterparts, they did so with training that was far different.
Excellent progress was made in discussions at these events with regard to future cooperation between the ASSA, the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa (CMSA) and the WACS. The details of examiner/observer status for colleagues from West Africa and South Africa are being worked out.
The WACS study was the first large trial to test the effects of vitamin C taken by itself, says lead researcher JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
The women concerned were Wacs - members of the United States Women's Army Corps - and these huts were to be their first experience of British accommodation.