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warm

1. (of colours) predominantly red or yellow in tone
2. (of a scent, trail, etc.) recently made; strong
3. near to finding a hidden object or discovering or guessing facts, as in children's games
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This forecast was a clear failure, as the earth has only warmed 0.6 [degrees] C (1.1 [degrees] F) in the last 100 years, with more than half of that total before the major greenhouse changes.
And then you look at how the earth's temperature has responded, and it has not warmed more than a tenth or two-tenths of a degree.
Reduce the heat, add the bread, and simmer until warmed through, about five minutes.
An experiment in which infrared heaters warmed ragweed on an Oklahoma prairie suggests that climate change actually is something to sneeze at.
Reuters, for example, featured a story on March 19th that claimed the Antarctic Peninsula had warmed by an astonishing 36 degrees Fahrenheit during the past half-century.
Transported by the oceans' natural conveyor belt, this newly warmed water flows north or south, out of the tropics and toward the poles, where it will grow cold, sink, and start the journey back.
When climate warmed during interglacials, the North American and European ice sheets melted, sending sea levels back up to a height on par with today's.
The National Research Council (NRC) committee concluded that Earth's surface has warmed dramatically over the past 2 decades, accelerating a trend observed throughout the 20th century.
A new study suggests that the past 20 years have been a climatologically curious time, when Earth's surface and the lower atmosphere have warmed at different rates.
At the same time, the Atlantic-water layer over the Lomonosov Ridge warmed by 1 [degrees] C, reaching a temperature not seen in the data going back to 1949, according to a January 1998 report by Morison and his colleagues in DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART I.