WIYN telescope

WIYN telescope

A 3.5-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, completed in 1994. It is a project of the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO). It has a lightweight borosilicate primary mirror, Ritchey–Chrétien optics, and an altazimuth mounting.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aperture of the WIYN telescope (S&T: July 2017, p.
The researchers used the WIYN telescope in Arizona to study 15 of the most promising candidates in visible light.
Observations from NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope and the visible-light WIYN telescope atop Kitt Peak in Arizona show that the plume contains old, red stars--exactly the type expected to make up the main stellar population in old elliptical galaxies.
The WIYN telescope produces images with a sharpness approaching that of the Hubble Space Telescope at red and near infrared wavelengths, and it can capture a much larger segment of the sky than Hubble does.
The new ODI imager will be so perfectly matched to the capabilities of the WIYN telescope that the combination will occupy a special forefront niche in ground-based astronomy.
5-meter WIYN telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona.
With Swift's X-ray data as guidance and using two telescopes in Arizona, the WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak and the PAIRITEL on Mount Hopkins, Josh Bloom of the University of California, Berkeley and his colleagues found an elliptical galaxy, devoid of new stars, that lies about 2.
5-m WIYN telescope on Arizona's Kitt Peak--are among the largest digital cameras ever made.
In another example, Jay Gallagher of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his colleagues recently compared Hubble images of the galaxy M82 with those taken by the WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona.
Using the WIYN Telescope atop Kitt Peak near Tucson, Walter M.
5-meter WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, she studied 11 central stars of planetary nebulae and found that 10 showed radial-velocity variations of at least a few kilometers per second, likely due to the gravitational tug of an orbiting companion star.
In fact, the primary for the WIYN telescope (a joint venture involving Wisconsin, Indiana, and Yale universities and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories) may be the most thoroughly tested large mirror ever produced.