WIYN telescope

WIYN telescope

A 3.5-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, completed in 1994. It is a project of the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO). It has a lightweight borosilicate primary mirror, Ritchey–Chrétien optics, and an altazimuth mounting.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
* The aperture of the WIYN telescope (S&T: July 2017, p.
Observations from NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope and the visible-light WIYN telescope atop Kitt Peak in Arizona show that the plume contains old, red stars--exactly the type expected to make up the main stellar population in old elliptical galaxies.
The WIYN telescope produces images with a sharpness approaching that of the Hubble Space Telescope at red and near infrared wavelengths, and it can capture a much larger segment of the sky than Hubble does.
Then there are the budget problems at the 3.5-meter WIYN telescope. In 2013 Yale decided that its research and academic priorities no longer included WIYN, and it formally pulled out of the partnership in 2014.
With Swift's X-ray data as guidance and using two telescopes in Arizona, the WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak and the PAIRITEL on Mount Hopkins, Josh Bloom of the University of California, Berkeley and his colleagues found an elliptical galaxy, devoid of new stars, that lies about 2.7 billon light-years from Earth.
Three of the cameras--the Dark Energy Camera on the 4-meter Blanco Telescope on Cerro Tololo, Chile; the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the 8.2-m Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea; and the One Degree Imager on the 3.5-m WIYN telescope on Arizona's Kitt Peak--are among the largest digital cameras ever made.
In another example, Jay Gallagher of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his colleagues recently compared Hubble images of the galaxy M82 with those taken by the WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona.
Crowl (Yale University) and three colleagues zoomed in on one Virgo Cluster denizen--12th-magnitude NGC 4402--with Kitt Peak's 3.5-meter WIYN telescope. Presented in last July's Astronomical Journal, their images depict material trailing from dense clouds of dust-laden gas, two of which are arrowed in the lower image at right.
Using the WIYN Telescope atop Kitt Peak near Tucson, Walter M.
Using the 3.5-meter WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, she studied 11 central stars of planetary nebulae and found that 10 showed radial-velocity variations of at least a few kilometers per second, likely due to the gravitational tug of an orbiting companion star.