weapon of mass destruction

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weapon of mass destruction

[′wep·ən əv ′mas di′strək·shən]
(ordnance)
Nuclear, bacteriological, or other weapon capable of causing widespread death or destruction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigators found a statistically significant reduction in office SBP and DBP among patients taking spironolactone compared with control groups (SBP: WMD = -15.7 mm Hg; 95% CI, -20.5 to -11 mm Hg; DBP: WMD = -6.21 mm Hg; 95% CI, -8.33 to -4.1 mm Hg).
Some may say that there are a myriad of reasons why the term CBRNE should not be used exclusively, but the statutory definition of WMD is far too broad for most DOD applications.
The EU's policy on the proliferation of WMD was first presented in an incipient form in 1980.
"There is a need to enable governments to simultaneously pursue the objectives of WMD non-proliferation and other economic objectives," he stressed.
Biological WMD are popularly considered the most taboo of offensive capabilities.
An RAF Regiment unit called the Defence Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Wing based at Winterbourne Gunner, Wilts, has already been warned to be prepared to work alongside the SAS in securing WMD sites in the Syria at short notice, it added.
This team, unlike prior versions that existed at post, will receive further medical and safety training to augment what they learned in the WMD course.
In his preface, Fred Schreier states a relevant and timely thesis focused on how a state's security sector should reform "to counter the preeminent threats posed by the unholy trinity of proliferation of WMD, terrorism, and organized crime." Schreier, a consultant of the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces, has both the academic background and practical defense-related experience to examine this challenge.
Essentially, counterforce operations would attack WMD sites and weapon systems prior to their use on the battlefield, while active defense (primarily air and missile defense) would intercept any incoming delivery systems containing NBC warheads.
Blair admitted that a key British government dossier of intelligence about Iraqi WMD in September 2002, which helped make the case for war, could have been clearer.
No WMD was used by Iraq, although it did fire some ballistic missiles into Kuwait; it is not clear whether those missiles were of U.N.-prohibited ranges (greater than 150 km).
Saudi Arabia Reiterates Its Call for a WMD Free Middle East