WTOR


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WTOR

References in periodicals archive ?
We also characterized adverse events based on wheelchair type, direction of excursion (fore-aft wheelchair excursion, lateral wheelchair excursion, combined fore-aft and lateral wheelchair excursion, and other wheelchair and/or wheelchair passenger excursion), and WTORS configuration (number of tiedowns applied and whether the lap belt and shoulder belt were used).
The tree-diagram in Figure 2 characterizes the direction of excursion and WTORS configuration for each adverse event with minor instability.
This WTORS loading scenario was anticipated because of the forward-facing wheelchair setup and rear-impact dynamics.
It is important to compare our results with previously published WTORS loading data.
References 1, 2: The corresponding International Standards for WTORS and wheelchairs are ISO 10542 and ISO 7176-19, respectively.
Providing equipment that is comparable in performance to federally regulated equipment means that WTORS and wheelchairs must be dynamically tested using a crash dummy to simulate typical occupant movements and loading (weight) that would occur in a frontal crash.
After each test, the wheelchair and WTORS were inspected for damage.
Known simply as WC19, ANSI/ RESNA*WC19: Wheelchairs for Use as Seats in Motor Vehicles described the design, performance, testing, and labeling of a wheelchair designed to work well with WTORS and able to withstand the forces of a crash test.
The ADA national standard for WTORS was developed without the benefit of adequate information concerning the risk of injury or death to wheelchair riders and with virtually no information concerning the transit bus crash environment.
SAE J2249 specifies numerous design and performance requirements for WTORS. The most important requirement, however, is that the wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system demonstrate effective performance when dynamically loaded by a 187-lb test wheelchair and a 170-lb adult crash dummy in a 30-mph, 20-g frontal impact test.
Only recently has the federal government approved regulations regarding standards for WTORS for transit and school buses.
It's now up to consumers and the people responsible for transporting children in wheelchairs to learn about these new standards, and to request information from wheelchair and WTORS manufacturers that show their products to be in compliance with the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) and ANSI/RESNA WC-19 (American National Standards Institute; RESNA is an association for the advancement of rehabilitation).