web page

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Web page

[′web ‚pāj]
(computer science)
A document written in HTML and available for viewing on the World Wide Web, may contain images, sound, video, formatted text, and hyperlinks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

web page

(World-Wide Web)
A block of data available on the World-Wide Web, identified by a URL. In the simplest, most common case, a web page is a file written in HTML, stored on the server. It may refer to images which appear as part of the page when it is displayed by a web browser. It is also possible for the server to generate pages dynamically in response to a request, e.g. using a CGI script.

A web page can be in any format that the browser or a helper application can display. The format is transmitted as part of the headers of the response as a MIME type, e.g. "text/html", "image/gif".

An HTML web page will typically refer to other web pages and Internet resources by including hypertext links.

A website often has a home page (usually just the hostname, e.g. http://foldoc.org/). It may also have individual home pages for each user with an account at the site.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Web page

A Web page is one of many files that make up a website. For example, when a website is accessed by only its domain name, such as www.computerlanguage.com, the home page is the first page the user sees.

The page is actually a text file coded in HTML and JavaScript with links to separate files (images, videos, buttons, etc.) that also appear on the page. See HTML and World Wide Web.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is in contrast to local approaches that seek to understand the interconnections among the set of www pages belonging to a single logical site or intranet; in such cases the amount of data is much smaller, and often a different set of considerations dominates.
This latter point is crucial since a number of www pages are pointed to by several hundred thousand pages, and we can't include all of them in [S.sub.[Sigma]] if we wish to keep it reasonably small.
Our approach, on the other hand, is determining, via the presence of links, what the creators of www pages tend to "classify" together with the given pages www.honda.com and www.nyse.com.
The www, on the other hand, is much more heterogeneous, with www pages serving many different functions--individual AOL subscribers have home pages, and multinational corporations have home pages.
Carriere and Kazman [1997] proposed a ranking measure on www pages, for the goal of re-ordering search results.
Lynx is an HTML interpreter that accesses WWW pages, but displays only the text information, with a dark block where graphics images would otherwise appear.
Oates worked quickly to transfer the entire set of WWW pages to a higher-capacity server.
I uploaded the images and HTML files to my Internet service provider, America Online, which offers each subscriber disk space to build his or her own WWW pages. CompuServe, Prodigy, and other providers have similar capability for members.
But, if you want a more hands-on approach to exploring gravity and collapsed objects, the producers of the PBS television science series Newton's Apple have WWW pages with activities from their programs, including one on black holes (http://ericir.syr.edu/Newton/11/blckhole.html).
An excellent site is the WWW pages assembled by the Working Group for the History of Astronomy, part of Astronomische Gesellschaft, a professional society in Germany (http://aibn55.astro.uni-bonn.de:8000/~pbrosche/astoria.html).
Since December 1994 he has converted some of the operational features of Home Planet into interactive WWW pages. Thus, if you have an Internet connection but aren't running Windows, you can experience his utilities by pointing your WWW browser to http://www.fourmilab.ch.