Wadai


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Wadai

(wädī`), former sultanate, N Chad, E of Lake Chad. Founded in the 16th cent., it was from time to time loosely subject to Darfur. Toward the end of the 19th cent., Wadai came under the influence of the Sanusi. The sultanate was gradually taken over (1903–13) by the French.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Wadai

 

(also Waddai or Ouaddaï), until the beginning of the 20th century a state in the central Sudan (on the territory of present-day Chad). The Wadai state emerged early in the second millennium A.D. The dominant nationality, the Maba, have been Islamicized since the 17th century. The state was divided into provinces, whose governors kept part of the taxes for their own use. In the 19th century in the districts inhabited by the Maba, feudal-dependent peasants paid a fixed rent, and slave labor was used. On the frontiers populated by non-Muslims, Wadai nobles collected an unlimited tribute. After stubborn resistance (1908-11), the Wadai territory was conquered by the French and was made part of the Ubangi-Chari-Chad colony (French Equatorial Africa).

REFERENCES

Istoriia Afriki v XlX-nachale XX v. Moscow, 1967. Pages 22, 321-22.
Carbou, H. La région de Tchad et du Ouadaï, vols. 1-2. Paris, 1912.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wadai

a former independent sultanate of NE central Africa: now the E part of Chad
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(33) Furthermore, France colonized Wadai (now the Republic of Chad) between 1909 and 1912.
(3) Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo K.K., 22 Wadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-4247, Japan
To address the Italian occupation of al-Jaghbub in 1925-1926, Fred Lawson considers it as a key point on the Wadai to Benghazi trans-Saharan route, with links to western Egypt.
They study the traditional influence of the Zaghawa, Tama, and Bideyat clans in the Wadai region of eastern Chad as well as the differences between "black" Saharan nomads, "Arab" Chadians, and the Chari-Baguirmi group.
Indeed, depending on the geopolitical situation, the presence of states as Wadai or Sokoto would prevent Borno from exerting its influence over its tributaries.
Possibly there were also some sexual encounters with men during Rimbaud's long sojourn in Aden and Ethiopia, in particular with a faithful retainer named Djami Wadai, who was remembered in his will.
Since then, the orthodox ideas, missionary efforts and propaganda were being successively spread out among the Arabs, Berbers, Tuaregs and Negroes dwelling in the territories of Kawar, Tibesti, Borku, Ennedi, Darfur, Wadai, Kanem, Chad, the Azger, the Airu, Baghrimi as far as to Senegal.
Six out of the fourteen stories in his collection are mythologized historical stories, four of which relate to the golden age of empires: two to the kingdom of Wadai (17th to 19th centuries), one to the founding of the Bagirmi kingdom (16th century) and one to a ruler of the Kanem empire (9th to 13th centuries).
The Lost Kingdoms of Africa is Jeffrey Tayler's account of his 4,000-kilometre journey across this region of the lower Sahara, through the wind-blasted pre-colonial kingdoms of Wadai and Kanem, along the gold, salt, ivory and slave routes.
[1.] Central Research Institute, Maruha Corp., 16-2, Wadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-4295, Japan.