wagtail

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wagtail:

see pipitpipit,
common name for a group of chiefly Eurasian and African birds that together with the wagtails constitute a subfamily of songbirds related to the Old World warblers and thrushes. Pipits are trim, slender birds with thin, pointed bills.
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parting slip, midfeather, wagtail

A long thin strip of wood in the box jamb of a cased frame which separates the sash weights from each other; also called a parting strip, parting bead.

wagtail

any of various passerine songbirds of the genera Motacilla and Dendronanthus, of Eurasia and Africa, having a very long tail that wags when the bird walks: family Motacillidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Wagtails mainly feed on insects that are taken aerially or gleaned off the ground, foliage, branches, or tree trunks (Cameron 1985).
But next winter there could be as few as eight available as a perch for the wagtails.
Our subspecies of Yellow Wagtail is almost unique to Britain, but a small number live in northern France, where they readily hybridise with the continental Blue-headed Wagtail.
As well as the yellow-headed flavissima race that breeds in England, there were blue-headed flava birds from the near Continent at RSPB Conwy and Bardsey, a grey-headed thunbergi wagtail from Scandinavia, also at RSPB Conwy, and the rarest bird, a black-headed feldegg wagtail from the Balkans which spent a day at Cemlyn.
We studied Eastern Yellow Wagtails at Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site, Alaska (61[degrees] 49' N, 166[degrees] 5' W) during May to August 1997-1999.
Six techniques were identified that would help reverse the decline of species such as skylarks, yellow wagtails and yellow hammers.
The famous street's trees - which have been home for generations to a unique city centre flock of pied wagtails - are to come down and be replaced with lime trees.
PIED wagtails leave the countryside every evening and head for town centres to form spectacular night-time roosts.
e rst House Martins were at RSPB Conwy and Bardsey; both sites have also reported White Wagtails, the continental version of our urban Pied Wagtail: numbers will peak in a fortnight.
Among the throng of yellow wagtails, whimbrel, white wagtails, whitethroats and others came two absolutely cracking species.
Four pied wagtails, some swifts, a blackheaded gull and a crow provided the highlights of a rainswept day as Hampshire and Warwickshire attempted to get their championship match under way.
Kingfishers, herons and grey wagtails are among the many birds seen regularly, while butterflies and flowers are abundant on both sites.