Black Tuesday

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Black Tuesday

day of stock market crash (1929). [Am. Hist.: Allen, 238]
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The Wall Street Crash of 1929 brought to a shuddering halt the excesses of The Roaring Twenties which had followed World War One.
Through 53 paintings, organised thematically to show bright-light cities, prairie pastorals, the churn of industry, and nostalgia for American history, the exhibition charts the anxieties of the decade between the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and the United States' entry into the Second World War in December 1941.
The cost of this 'intrusion' must have contributed to the Wall Street crash of 1929 and spawned the consequent world depression and the rise of fascism and World War Two.
In the case of the Wall Street Crash of 1929, a well-known quote attributed to John D.
The Cavendon Women is the unabridged audiobook adaptation of a dramatic novel following two families, the Inghams and the Swanns, from weekend gathering in the summer of 1926 to the horrendous economic devastation of the Wall Street crash of 1929.
This was the pattern in the Wall Street crash of 1929, the Tokyo stock market crash of 1990 and the worldwide crisis of 2008.
Tippin observed that historical accounts of the Great Depression tend to minimize Florida's fiscal devastation, as well as overlook the fact that the Great Depression came to Florida two full years before the shattering Wall Street crash of 1929.
Actually, the Wall Street crash of 1929 did not curb America's robust appetite for movies.
The Wall Street crash of 1929 occurred in October and no doubt there were lesser, but still noteworthy, incidents throughout the intervening Octobers.
30, 1929, one day after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.
After that, the dominoes destroyed the stock market, harking back to the Wall Street Crash of 1929, before showing the Berlin Wall fall, and London's Tower Bridge, with blue tiles symbolising the River Thames moving back and forth.
He committed suicide after losing his fortune in the Wall Street Crash of 1929.