Walpi


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Walpi

(wäl`pē) [Hopi,=place of the gap], pueblo, NE Ariz., on a mesa NE of Flagstaff; founded c.1700. Its inhabitants are Pueblo who speak the Hopi language (Uto-Aztecan linguistic family). One of the most picturesque pueblos of the Southwest, it is a major tourist attraction. It was founded as a refuge in anticipation of Spanish retaliation for the Pueblo revolt (1680). The pueblo, however, is gradually being deserted for the new village of Polacca at the foot of the mesa.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Included you will find: The Song of Creation - A Hopi Legend, The White Dawn of Hopi, The Pookonghoyas and the Cannibal Monster, The Two War Gods and the Two Maidens, Dug-From Ground, Origin Myth, Coming Of The Hopi From The Underworld, The Origin Of Some Oraibi Clans, The Spider Clan, The Bear Clan, The Wanderings Of The Spider Clan (Kohk'ang-Namu), The Origin Of The Yayaatu Society, The Origin Of Some Mishongnovi Clans, The Destruction Of Palatkwapi, How Ball-head (Tatciqto) Wedded And Oraibi Maiden, The Aho'li And Other Walpi Katcinas, Pookonghoya And His Brother As Theives, and many, many more.
First Mesa includes the villages of Walpi, Sichomovi, and Tewa, Second Mesa includes the villages of Shungopavi, Mishongovi, and Sipaulovi.
The speaker is a thirty-year-old medicine man aspirant from Walpi. His name is White Hawk, and he is a
"That afternoon at Walpi? We talked to that old Indian?"
His works were to adorn the new Interior building in Washington, D.C., and, as the first photographer to be included in this project, Adams again traveled to the Southwest to photograph the Grand Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, Zion National Park, Saguaro National Monument, Mesa Verde, Walpi Pueblo, and Carlsbad Caverns.
We stopped at the Walpi visitor center to inquire where we might photograph a Hopi kiln.
Monroe returned to Arizona in the summer of 1901 with her sister to visit not only the Canyon, but the Painted Desert and the ancient Hopi village of Walpi, where the two women witnessed the sacred rite of the Hopi Snake Dance.
"On Second Mesa, in the village of Walpi, a man came up while I was walking the balustrade around the edge of the mesa, and offered to explain the Hopi beliefs.
Most Hopi dances are closed to the public, but the `social' dances which occur near Walpi are open, as long as visitors are polite and respectful.
Don't leave without visiting Walpi. At theprow of First Mesa, Walpi has been continuously inhabited since the 1600s.
In the summer of 1927 the Melvilles arrived at the Hopi villages of Sichomovi, Walpi, and Polacca in northeastern Arizona.