Walrus Tusk

Walrus Tusk

 

an upper canine tooth of a walrus. In males, the tusks are laterally compressed and may reach a length of 72 cm and a weight of 3 kg; in females, they are shorter and more rounded in section. The walrus uses the tusks to dig for food (primarily mollusks) from the sea bottom, to lift itself up onto ice floes, and to defend itself against enemies. Walrus tusks are used for carving small sculpture, beads, brooches, knives, and similar articles; the Chukchi, Eskimo, and other peoples of the north are particularly skillful in this art.

References in periodicals archive ?
The warrior, made from walrus tusk more than 800 years ago, was auctioned by Sotheby's in London.
"It was catalogued in his purchase ledger that he had bought an 'Antique Walrus Tusk Warrior Chessman'.
Walrus tusk became a valuable commodity the Norse leveraged when they journeyed to the island in the 10th century.
Meyer will bring a rare container carved from a large walrus tusk by an Eskimo artist; collected by a known whaler in the second half of the 19th century, it may have been used for carrying tinder or storing snuff.
All those angles taught me to wish that John, from his prison on Patmos, had imagined another heaven: eternity packed in the florets of a daisy, sectioned in a curve of nautilus, a long arc of walrus tusk. Surely he'd traced the veins on a leaf, seen golden sculptures of the gods-- but like his cell, John's heaven was a cube.
Under the pile, just off the road, the skeleton of a boy buried face down, a flat stone across his lower back, and to give him hope on his journey a walrus tusk, some red pigment, a flute sculpted from a bird's bone and the toggled point of a harpoon.
Of all the extractive harvesting documented in the far north, including walrus tusk and beavers (of note, northern fur seals did not migrate beyond the Bering Strait and so there is only glancing coverage of them), the most riveting and seemingly consequential--which is saying a lot because the fur trade wreaked extensive havoc on existing pathways in whatever guise it took--was indeed commercial whaling.
The milder climate also allowed their open-decked wooden ships to maintain trade with Europe, exporting walrus tusk ivory and polar bear skins in exchange for both necessities (iron, lumber, tar) and luxury goods (stained glass and communion wine for their cathedral at Gardar).
I normally prefer my sixguns to be constructed of blued steel, stainless if I must, wood grips, stag and, most assuredly, elephant or walrus tusk. However, I can change.
It's a place to try on snow goggles, hold a walrus tusk, and examine baleen baskets, opening the window to Arctic culture and craft.