Warrior

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Warrior,

river, Ala.: see Black WarriorBlack Warrior,
navigable river, 178 mi (286 km) long, rising in N central Ala. and flowing generally SW to the Tombigbee River. The Black Warrior drains a coal- and cotton-producing area, but these industries have declined, specifically in Birmingham, Ala.
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Warrior

[′wär·ē·ər]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
In Aqhat "the narrative sets out the basic gender polarity of warrior culture, which focuses on the young male warrior and experienced female divine warrior" (p.
Conway captures the essence of the warrior culture in these enduring principles: "Every Marine a Rifleman, Expeditionary Naval Force, Combined Arms Organizations, Ready and Forward Deployed, Agile and Adaptable, and Marines Take Care of Their Own" (11).
Warrior Culture doesn't have to be men and women who wear a uniform and train for combat against a foreign enemy.
This genteel consideration actually blinds us to the barbarism of our own "warrior culture".
We, the United States, the warrior culture of progress, of better living through chemistry, is what the Haitians do not want to become.
"To the fan, we exist only in the 1800s as a warrior culture."
Hall (Montgomery College, Maryland) draws on his background in Japanese martial arts, the US military, and Buddhist studies and practice to examine the cult of the Buddhist Warrior Goddess Marishiten and its impact on Japanese warrior culture. He highlights elements that may be useful in the psychological welfare of modern combatants.
Steeped in classical knowledge of the Greeks and their warrior culture, he also has an in-depth knowledge of modern military technology and its most recent developments.
THE STORY: Conrad Farrell, a classics major at Williams College, is enamored with the warrior culture of ancient Sparta.
One of the charms of this memoir is Harjo's portrayal of the spiritual nobility of our Native American warrior culture, which confers a powerful sense of responsibility to maintain and protect our peoples and cultures through the tragedies and complexities of our histories.
Two former members of the Monty Python troupe (Terry Jones and John Cleese) attempted a send-up of The Vikings and all it represents in the 1989 film, Erik the Viking, which actually provides the most thoughtful commentary to date on Viking culture by smashing cliches about Viking mythology (the gods are here portrayed as children), berserk warrior culture, and even rower seating arrangements (!).