Warwick


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Warwick,

town (1991 pop. 21,701) and district, county seat of Warwickshire, central England, on the Avon River. The town has some commerce and manufacturing. Warwick is best known for Warwick Castle, located on the site of a fortress built by Æthelflæd, the daughter of King Alfred, in 915. The castle was begun in the 14th cent. and was converted into a mansion in the 17th cent. St. Mary's Church there dates partly from the 12th cent.; partially burned in 1694, it was redesigned by William Wilson, a pupil of Christopher WrenWren, Sir Christopher,
1632–1723, English architect. A mathematical prodigy, he studied at Oxford. He was professor of astronomy at Gresham College, London, from 1657 to 1661, when he became Savilian professor of astronomy at Oxford.
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. The Beauchamp Chapel (1443–64) is noteworthy. In the church are a Norman crypt and monuments to Richard de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, to his countess, and to Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester. Within the district, Royal Leamington Spa is a popular health resort.

Warwick

(wôr`wĭk, wŏ`rĭk), city (1990 pop. 85,427), Kent co., central R.I., at the head of Narragansett Bay; settled by Samuel GortonGorton, Samuel,
c.1592–1677, Anglo-American religious leader, founder of Warwick, R.I., b. near Manchester, England. Seeking religious freedom, he emigrated to America (1637) but, because of his unorthodox religious teachings, was banished successively from Boston and
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e 1642, inc. as a city 1931. Its long important textile industry, now closed, dated from 1794. Current manufactures include machinery, metals, pipes and tubing, and silverware. The town includes the villages of Apponaug, on Greenwich Bay; Hillsgrove, site of the state airport; Warwick; and several former resort areas. Warwick village was nearly destroyed (1676) in King Philip's WarKing Philip's War,
1675–76, the most devastating war between the colonists and the Native Americans in New England. The war is named for King Philip, the son of Massasoit and chief of the Wampanoag. His Wampanoag name was Pumetacom, Metacom, or Metacomet.
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. Gaspee Point, S of Pawtuxet, was the scene of the burning of the British revenue cutter GaspeeGaspee
, British revenue cutter, burned (June 10, 1772) at Namquit (now Gaspee) Point in the present-day city of Warwick on the western shore of Narragansett Bay, R.I. The vessel arrived in Mar.
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 in 1772; annual "Gaspee Days" commemorate the event. Warwick has a very large music arena and an amusement park. Nathanael GreeneGreene, Nathanael,
1742–86, American Revolutionary general, b. Potowomut (now Warwick), R.I. An iron founder, he became active in colonial politics and served (1770–72, 1775) in the Rhode Island assembly.
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 was born in the city.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Warwick

 

a city in the northeastern USA, in the state of Rhode Island, on Narragansett Bay of the Atlantic Ocean. A southern suburb of Providence. Population, 90,000 (1974). Warwick has light industry, as well as metalworking and foodprocessing industries. Commercial fishing is carried out in the area. Seaside resort areas are nearby.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Warwick

1
Earl of, title of Richard Neville, known as the Kingmaker. 1428--71, English statesman. During the Wars of the Roses, he fought first for the Yorkists, securing the throne (1461) for Edward IV, and then for the Lancastrians, restoring Henry VI (1470). He was killed at Barnet by Edward IV

Warwick

2
a town in central England, administrative centre of Warwickshire, on the River Avon: 14th-century castle, with collections of armour and waxworks: the university of Warwick (1965) is in Coventry. Pop.: 23 350 (2001)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the key features of the programme, which the university estimates will cost it PS10m a year to run, will be admissions offers up to four grades below Warwick's standard A-level offer.
1/4/1801 John Palmer and Hannah Palmer, both executed in Warwick for the murder of Mrs.
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En route, Warwick gets stranded 40ft up a pole at Derbyshire Mountain Rescue.
"I'm blown away,'' said the 33-year-old Warwick, an independent audio engineer who lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Ashley Warwick.
The Warwick Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Warwick area.
Lord Warwick acquired the vase during a stay at Warwick Castle, but two years later it was deposited in Warwick castle''s courtyard where it remained, displayed without its pedestal.
For further information and a full list of attractions and shows visit www.warwick-castle.com | This voucher entitles the holder to 1 Standard FREE ENTRY to Warwick Castle when accompanied by one full paying adult ticket.
A former University of Warwick engineering undergraduate, he said: "I absolutely love Warwick in Africa.
However, the terms of the sale were not disclosed and nobody from Warwick was available for comment last night on whether it will affect the Flintshire company's 160-strong workforce.
ROCKAVON (of the Sunday Mail) Today's nap: SENOR SHANE (4.00 Warwick) KLONDYKE MINELLA BOYS (3.30 Warwick) SOUND STAGE (4.10 Ffos Las) AAMAN (4.20 Southwell) POT LUCK Warwick placepot 1.15 -1, 9; 1.45 -6; 2.20 -3; 2.55 -2, 5; 3.30 -4; 4.00 -1, 2.