Washington Monument


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Washington Monument,

obelisk-shaped tower, 555 ft 5 1-9 in. (169.3 m) high, located on a 106-acre (43-hectare) site at the west end of the Mall, Washington, D.C.; dedicated 1885. The world's tallest building when completed, it remains the capital's tallest building.

In 1783 the Continental Congress approved an equestrian statue of George WashingtonWashington, George,
1732–99, 1st President of the United States (1789–97), commander in chief of the Continental army in the American Revolution, called the Father of His Country. Early Life

He was born on Feb. 22, 1732 (Feb. 11, 1731, O.S.
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, and in 1791 architect Pierre L'EnfantL'Enfant, Pierre Charles
, 1754–1825, American soldier, engineer, and architect. Born in France, he volunteered as a private in the American Revolution. He won Gen. Washington's attention with his design for the insignia of the Society of the Cincinnati.
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 included a site for the statue near the present location of the monument in his plans for the federal city. Washington, however, objected to the idea. After Washington's death in 1799, plans for a memorial were discussed but none was adopted.

In 1832 the private Washington National Monument Society was formed. Its activity brought gifts of money as well as blocks of stone from each state, some foreign governments, and private individuals. These "tribute blocks" carry inscriptions on the inside walls of the monument. Architect Robert MillsMills, Robert,
1781–1855, American architect of the classic revival period, b. Charleston, S.C. From 1800 to 1820 he worked as an architect in Washington, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, being associated at different times with Thomas Jefferson, James Hoban, and B. H. Latrobe.
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's elaborate Greek temple design was accepted for the monument, and on July 4, 1848, the cornerstone was laid.

Work on the project was interrupted by political quarreling in the 1850s; by the Civil War, funds became scarce. It was not until 1876 that Congress took over the project and appropriated money for the monument. The base, entirely different from Mills's design, was completed in 1880; the aluminum top was positioned in 1884; and the monument was opened to the public in 1888. The top may be reached by elevator; public access by the stairs is no longer permitted. From 1997 to 2019 the monument was repeatedly closed several years at a time for renovations, security improvements, and repairs.

Washington Monument

Address:c/o National Capitol Park - Central
900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, DC 20024

Phone:202-426-6841
Web: www.nps.gov/wamo/
Size: 106 acres.
Established: Authorized on January 31, 1848; completed on December 6, 1884; transferred from Office of Public Buildings and Public Parks of the National Capital on August 10, 1933.
Location:At Constitution Ave. and 15th St. in Washington, DC.
Facilities:Rest rooms (é), museum/exhibit.
Activities:Guided tour.
Special Features:A dominating feature of the Nation's Capital, this 555-foot obelisk honors the country's first President, George Washington. The architect-designer was Robert Mills.

See other parks in District of Columbia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not since 1951, when President Harry Truman spoke before a large gathering on the Washington Monument grounds to mark the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, has a commander in chief made an Independence Day speech to a sizable crowd on the Mall.
On February 22, 1885, the Philadelphia Press not only published Whitman's poem to mark the occasion of the dedication of the Washington Monument, but featured an account of the official ceremonies that had taken place the previous day: "A raw penetrating wind blew across the Potomac Flats this morning and chilled to the marrow about 5000 people who had assembled around the monument." When Ohio Senator John Sherman addressed the shivering crowd, he declared, "The monument speaks for itself--simple in form, admirable in proportions, composed of enduring marble and granite....It is the most imposing, costly and appropriate monument ever erected in honor of one man." (46) Following the speeches and the parade, President Chester Arthur accepted the monument on behalf of the nation.
A lovely couple at the Washington Monument asked me to take their picture and later, a second group from Argentina asked me for directions to the National Air and Space Museum.
Three hours later, the space shuttle and jumbo soared over the Washington Monument and the White House.
As a result of the August 23, 2011 earthquake that rocked the east coast of the United States, the Washington Monument suffered damages that the National Park Service did not have the funds to repair.
After introductory chapters on semiotics in general and other analyses of American culture and society, he briefly explains the cultural meanings attached to these icons and uses specific disciplines and theories of cultural criticism to explain their importance, such as Disneyland according to Freud, the Mall of America through the perspective of Baudrillard, and the Washington Monument through ideas of Barthes.
The Washington Monument, which sustained cracking, and the Washington National Cathedral were among the national monuments that sustained damage in the 5.8-magnitude earthquake Aug.
Obama delivered remarks in the Blue Room of the White House against a backdrop of the soaring white obelisk of the Washington monument on the National Mall.
The fixed rate, non-recourse construction-permanent loan will be used to finance the 218-unit apartment building that will feature such amenities as a rooftop pool with views of the Capitol and the Washington Monument, a fitness center, and 160 below-grade parking spaces, located at 443 New York Avenue, in the Mount Vernon Triangle.
Photos of Valk and company with duct tape over their mouths and the Washington Monument in the background have become a symbol of the march, and nearly everyone involved in planning the weekend's events agrees it was the youth turnout that made the National Equality March a success.
The museum, located just off the National Mall near the Washington Monument, is a popular tourist attraction and draws about 1.7 million visitors each year.
The article in Information Today by Shirley Duglin Kennedy [April 2009, Internet Waves, "The Washington Monument Syndrome"] "hit the bull's eye so to speak." We now have a library full of computers and also have laptops for student/community use.

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