Wassenaar Arrangement

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Wassenaar Arrangement

(The Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies) An initiative of more than 30 countries, including the U.S. and U.K., that restricts the export of armaments and other products such as cryptographic software and hardware to particular regions or countries in the world. For information, visit www.wassenaar.org. See EAR.
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The US is spearheading India's campaign for inclusion in the group and contends that after attaining membership of other multilateral export control regimes like Missile TechnoAlogy Control Regime (MTCR), Australia Group, and Wassenaar Agreement Indian case is ripe for membership.
Following the entry, India became a member of the three of the four non-proliferation regimes- Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), the Wassenaar Agreement (WA) and the Australia Group (AG).
In the latter category are the Wassenaar agreement that controls the export of conventional weaponry, the Australia Group whose list of chemical and biological precursors is more extensive than that which operates under the Chemical Weapons Convention, the Nuclear Suppliers Group of all nations with the significant nuclear materials export capability.
Although investing in 300-mm wafer fabs in China is still banned to Taiwanese companies on grounds of national security, the Kuomintang-led Republic of China government is considering an easing of the ban in accordance with the Wassenaar Agreement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Uses Goods and Technologies.
This agreement is usually referred to as the Wassenaar agreement, after the place where it was reached.
In order to control these processes, a majority of European countries, along with Australia, Canada, the United States, Japan and New Zealand, signed the Wassenaar Agreement on December 19, 1995.
policy into compliance with the Wassenaar Agreement, a multinational treaty on export controls.
This is not the case with the Department of Commerce or with the 33 nations that are signatories to the Wassenaar agreement. In December the Wassenaar nations agreed to limit consumers' access to cryptographic software.
"As in the building of a polder, everyone must co-operate and make sacrifices to repel the flood of unemployment and transform Dutch society into a flourishing, tranquil landscape." This and the like were repeated in the statements of government ministers, union officials and company directors when the unions and management in 1982 signed the Wassenaar agreement, the political birthright of the Polder model.
The deal, struck in the affluent commuter town of Wassenaar, became known as the Wassenaar agreement.
An important element of the new economic strategy was an agreement between employers and trade unions (the so-called "Wassenaar agreement") on wage moderation combined with a reduction in working time.
India is keen to become a member of the NSG and other export control regimes such as the Wassenaar Agreement and Australia Group as it seeks to significantly expand its nuclear power generation.