wasteland

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wasteland

a barren or desolate area of land, not or no longer used for cultivation or building
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Waste Land was written in the aftermath of The First World War and evokes a fragmented world of different voices, cultures, myths and emotions.
Mostly, land of old river bed is uncultivated or only cultivated in Kharif season being low lying, having severe water logging and salinity problems, the chairman said adding, high water table associated with build-up of soil salinity has converted productive land into waste land especially in these typical areas.
Eliot's stay in Margate in 1921 is the starting point for an exhibition, 'Journeys with "The Waste Land'", which opens this month at Turner Contemporary on the Margate seafront (until 7 May).
If one feels currents of sexuality rippling throughout The Waste Land with its motifs of impotence, sterility, mechanical lovemaking, lost innocence, and even homosexuality (Mr.
Eliot's "The Waste Land," and if you did study the poem in college, you might recall that the poet is here offering a dark rejoinder to the opening of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, whose famous prologue also begins with a line about April, only Chaucer is celebrating the springtime return of hope to the world.
Cunard was an accomplished poet when she wrote Parallax, having published her books Outlaws in 1921 and Sublunary in 1923; Eliot first published The Waste Land in his literary magazine The Criterion in 1922.
Eliot's The Waste Land (1922) happened to poetry the way that James Joyce's Ulysses (1922) happened to prose.
Eliot's The Waste Land, Charles Williams's The Greater Trumps, Samuel R.
Finally the fencing or boards in Lister Road fell down last month and that waste land is now being used as a dumping ground where I have seen rats running around.
This paper will essentially focus on Eliot's debt to Shakespeare in The Waste Land and, since all of Eliot's explicit allusions to Shakespeare in his poem have all been duly identified and commented upon by editors and critics, I will mainly insist on a number of so far unnoticed or neglected Shakespearean sources and analogues in order to interpret them in terms of musicality and theatricality.
Further, Zenobias fragmented structure and seemingly disconnected thoughts transitioning the last trace of transcendence into a realm of random montage within the quotidian life suggests that Naum's book, like Breton's mystifying Nadja, is also a modernist text, a metaphorical translation of The Waste Land, T.
The Sonnets is another literary triumph from the Faber/Touch Press collaboration that brought us The Waste Land app, and with a very similar approach and interface.

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