Water Striders


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Water Striders

 

several families (Gerridae, Hydrometridae and others) of aquatic bugs of the order Heteroptera. Water striders are small insects (from 2 to 34 mm) with delicate, elongated bodies and long legs. They skim rapidly or walk easily over the water’s surface (hence the name).

Water striders are often wingless, and the lower surface of their bodies is covered with a velvety down. There are about 600 widely distributed species. Species of the genus Halo-bates and others similar to it are found in the tropical regions of oceans. In Europe the common species of water striders are from the genera Gerris and Hydrometra. In the fresh waters of the USSR, Gerris lacustris is the most common species. Water striders are predators, and they also suck the corpses of animals. Freshwater striders lay their eggs on aquatic plants; sea striders carry them on their bodies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Factors influencing sexual size dimorphism in temperate water striders. American Naturalist 136:61-86.
A revision of Amemboa Esaki with notes on the phylogeny and ecological evolution of eotrechine water striders (Insecta, Hemiptera, Gerridae).
The water strider is an insect that skates across water at high speed.
* Water striders live on the surface of ponds, slow streams, and other quiet waters.
Water striders can't Bite humans, but small bugs unlucky enough to fall into the leggy insect's skating grounds are another matter.
Morse's class selected such study topics as salamanders, water moccasins, crayfish, frogs, water striders, water boatman, ducks, the pond bottom, and algae/plankton.
Fitness consequences of alternative life histories in water striders, Aquarius remigis (Heteroptera: Gerridae).
I become abstracted while my students create a "Field Guide to What Water Does." When I check in, I find one man who has discovered that water striders only dimple the surface of the creek without breaking its tension, and create four sets of round ripples each time they move.
These examples comprise studies in water-living insects, such as amphipods and water striders, and also in land insects, as investigated in a recent study in Australian plague locusts that are at a higher risk of being eaten as mating pairs compared to single animals.
In a comparison with the animal world, Wilson says people in a community can behave more like water striders he observed on a pond, careening around in pursuit of their own goals, or more like wasps, "working together, without necessarily knowing it, for the common good."
Water striders (Heteroptera: Gerridae) are excellent study organisms to address these questions because they can be reared individually in the laboratory, measurements of the cuticles cast during molting provide an accurate record of growth, and each molt is a distinct developmental event.