drainage divide

(redirected from Water divide)

drainage divide

[′drān·ij də‚vīd]
(geology)
The border of a drainage basin.
The boundary separating adjacent drainage basins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
An instructive definition by UP photogrammetrist Romeo Bruce is: 'A body of land bounded above by a ridge or water divide and below by the level at which water drains from it.' Watersheds occur in upland areas; thus, except on the flat islands, almost three-fourths of the Philippine terrain are characterized by large watersheds or river basins.
The Nigula mire is a water divide into four main surface water courses, called the Salatsi, Lemme, Haademeeste and Rannametsa rivers.
The groundwater divide is assumed to coincide with the surface water divide
HELSINGOR is just north of Copenhagen, and is the place where Denmark is closest to Sweden - only 21/1 miles of water divide the two countries.
The capture zone extends from a point termed the downgradient stagnation point, located downstream of the well with respect to the direction of groundwater flow, to an upgradient location usually defined by a geologic boundary or by a surface water divide. The capture zone cannot be adequately delineated prior to performing a pumping test at the site, therefore, potential sources of contamination within a half mile radius from the site should be assessed.
Since no more than 62 km of Red Sea water divides the Saudi and African coasts, the Iranian missiles are well able to block shipping and tanker traffic plying to and from the Gulf of Suez and the Persian Gulf.
Zayandeh-Rood Water divides into some branches as enters Isfahan and is drunk when needed".
Which stretch of water divides Anglesey from the Welsh mainland?
Mr Bourne is downright cross that a trench of red water divides Welsh Labour from its English fellows and that the reforms which are taking place are increasing the power of the state.
In the east, which body of water divides Russia and the U.S.
Sir William Grove, a Swansea-born judge, observed in 1839 that sending an electric current through water divides it into its two component parts of hydrogen and oxygen.