water clock

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water clock:

see clepsydraclepsydra
or water clock,
ancient device for measuring time by means of the flow of water from a container. A simple form of clepsydra was an earthenware vessel with a small opening through which the water dripped; as the water level dropped, it exposed marks on the
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.

water clock

[′wȯd·ər ‚kläk]
(horology)
An ancient device to estimate time; the operation depended upon the slow emptying of water from one graduated vessel into another, and the graduations marked the time periods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suegioo looks in the handicapper's grip, while last year's second Waterclock has lost form.
A winner on the Flat, Waterclock did not enjoy the best passage when beaten just under four lengths on Boxing Day and appeared to finish with a little left in the locker.
Waterclock was among the 31 horses for the prestigious staying handicap, which has a maximum field of 17.
Waterclock (centre), ridden by James Doyle, beats Hefner (left) and Stencive at odds of 25-1 in the 1m maiden at Newbury yesterday.
Slowly away, she made stealthy headway under Silvestre de Sousa before staying on stoutly to win going away by three lengths from Waterclock.
The Lambourn-based rider is increasingly in demand and he again impressed with a double for Roger Charlton on juveniles Priceless Jewel and Waterclock.
Yesterday's highlight The second division of the 1m maiden at Newbury proved an eventful race for in-running players as the 25-1 winner Waterclock was matched at a high of 110 before scoring narrowly.
Further, the famous clock automata erected over the Jayrun Gate at Damascus by Muhammad ab-Sa'ati in 1164, which remained a working public spectacle in 1326 when it was observed by Ibn Battuta, together with other waterclocks (as at Fez) and sundials, demonstrate an interest in the exhibition of time in public spaces prior to the late-nineteenth-century clock towers in Ottoman territory described in Celik's work.