Watson-Watt


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Watson-Watt

Sir Robert Alexander. 1892--1973, Scottish physicist, who played a leading role in the development of radar
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Robert Watson-Watt put together and managed a team of brilliant scientists and electronic engineers to develop this observation to make it a useful tool.
By the time of the Battle of Britain, pioneering work by the National Physical Laboratory's Sir Robert Watson-Watt ensured that the UK had become the first nation in the world to exploit the potential of radar.
When Battle of Britain ace Peter Brothers responded to the James "revelations" via The Daily Telegraph, he argued that "the first thing that won the Battle of Britain was radar." (4) Indeed, this was the claim originally made by Radio Direction Finding (RDF) pioneer Robert Watson-Watt (1892-1973) to Archibald Sinclair, secretary of state for Air, in December 1940 and subsequently accepted with few reservations by well-known authors such as H.
The Watson-watt technique, developed by Sir Robert Watson-watt (of radar-development fame) uses three antennas in a line.
Take radar, which had its roots in work carried out by German scientists before it was refined by Robert Watson-Watt. He was originally commissioned by the Air Ministry in 1935 to investigate the possibility of a death ray.
Radar was invented by a Scotsman, Robert Watson-Watt, who took out his first patent on the technology when he was a lecturer at St.
Here Watson-Watt carried out some of his earliest experiments into radar in 1935.
The Scottish physicist Robert Alexander Watson-Watt (1892-1973) worked on devices for the emission of microwaves and for the detection of the reflected beam.
Met Office physicist Robert Watson-Watt carried out the first demonstration of radar, where signals from a BBC shortwave transmitter were bounced off an aircraft.
1935: Radar (Radio Detection and Ranging) was first demonstrated as a means of locating aircraft in Daventry by Robert Watson-Watt in a top secret experiment, which led to its development as a system crucial in winning the Battle of Britain.
Edward "Taffy" Bowen was a brilliant scientist who worked with Watson-Watt on his ground-to-air radars, and later Bowen went on to develop radar installed in aircraft to detect U-boat submarines.
CASTLES IN THE SKY BBC2, 9pm Fact-based drama about the development of Britain's radar system during the 1930s by Robert Watson-Watt and a team of relatively unproven and unknown scientists, an invention that was to prove decisive in the Battle of Britain.