anthropic principle

(redirected from Weak anthropic principle)
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Related to Weak anthropic principle: Strong anthropic principle, Anthropic argument

anthropic principle

(an-throp -ik) A principle that was put forward in the 1960s by R. Dicke and maintains that the presence of life in the Universe places constraints on the ways in which the very early Universe evolved: the possible initial conditions are limited to those that give rise to an inhabited Universe, i.e. what we observe must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

anthropic principle

[an′thräp·ik ′prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The assertion that the presence of intelligent life on earth places limits on the many ways the universe could have developed and could have caused the conditions of temperature that prevail today.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas pure chance is the primary explanation for the weak anthropic principle, chance plays a more minor role in Kauffman emergence theories.
The book leads with a gracious dedication to his family and is composed of seven chapters: (1) "Science and Religion: Some Preliminaries," (2) "Fine-Tuning and Cosmology," (3) "Relativity, Time, and Free Will," (4) "Divine Action and the Laws of Nature," (5) "Naturalisms and Design," (6) "Reduction and Emergence," and (7) "The Philosophy of Science Tool Chest." Within these chapters, Koperski addresses such topics as abductive reasoning, the strong and weak anthropic principles, atheism as an assumed fundamental precept of science, Boltzmann brains, determinism and free will, arguments and evidence regarding divine intervention, emergence and reductionism, evil, evolution, creationism and intelligent design, fine-tuning of the universe, and multiverse theories.