wearable computing

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wearable computing

Electronic devices that are worn on the body or clothes. The first wearable computing devices were body-worn computers in the military, followed by consumer products such as MP3 players strapped to the arm and fitness devices that compute distance and heart rate. As of 2016, smartwatches, heads-up augmented reality displays, healthcare monitors and smart clothing are wearable technology products. Wearable electronics is expected to be a growth industry. See augmented reality, POV camera, fitness tracker, smart clothes, body-worn computer, smartwatch and Google Glass.
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With the advancement in wearable technology, activity trackers and smart wristbands could soon be replaced by other in or on body devices.
According to ACSM wearable technology includes fitness trackers, smart watches, heart rate monitors, and GPS tracking devices.
WE live in a world where gadgets and technology make our lives easier and with wearable technology comes the added promise of increased worker safety and productivity.
The wearable technology enables hearing and deaf audiences to feel the nuances of music via the skin.
Summary: Los Angeles [United States], January 7 (ANI): At the ongoing CES 2019, L'Oreal showcased a new wearable technology that measures the skin hydration level.
M2 EQUITYBITES-October 12, 2018-Hill's Pet Nutrition Acquires Wearable Technology of Vetrax
"The demand for wearable technology will always see growth because wearables have a unique ability to bridge the gap between a user and their smart devices like phones and tablets."
In the next evolution of wearable technology, the Runway smartwatch offers a new highly personalized experience with heart-rate tracking, swimproof functionality, payment methods, untethered GPS and more.
In the Middle East, examples of contractors using wearable technology are even scarcer.
In the late 1980s and early 1990s, further progress in the area of wearable technology made smart glasses commercially available (Havard & Podsiad, 2017).