Web 1.0


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Web 1.0

A general reference to the World Wide Web during its first few years of operation. The term is mostly used to contrast the earlier days of the Web before blogs, wikis, social networking sites and Web-based applications became commonplace. See Web 2.0.
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The differences in terms of the definitions and features of Web 2.0 compared with those of Web 1.0 help to focus this paper's research endeavors.
"With Web 1.0, if my URL infringes on someone else's copyright, the question was whether or not my [general liability coverage] policy covers that.
Web 1.0 was the movement that took place during the beginning of the Internet.
This is the shift from Web 1.0 thinking to Web 2.0 thinking.
It provides details on current usage levels, key Web 1.0 and 2.0 player strategies, pioneer initiatives to monetise the community and the development of a new paradigm, based on the social graph and interoperability tools, which will likely have an impact on Internet services across the board.
If Web 1.0 (even though we did not know it was "1.0" at the time) was a read-only medium, today's Web 2.0 is read/write.
In 2004, tech visionary Tim O'Reilly was just beginning to explain what he meant by the term "Web 2.0"--when many people still hadn't fully grasped the implications of Web 1.0. It would be another couple years before his "web as participation platform" vision came to be realized.
A rule of thumb in the Web 1.0 Age was that if you wanted a lot of traffic on a website, the site had to change pretty much daily.
The current wave of this technology revolution, called Web 2.0, followed the initial wave (Web 1.0) that collapsed with the dot.com boom and bust.
We have evolved from simple, primitive Internet experiences in the early 1980s to Web 1.0 capabilities fueled in the late 1990s by the likes of Yahoo, Amazon, AOL and eBay.
Compared to "Web 1.0," Web 2.0 fills the gap between a web browser and desktop applications.
I've seen many sites that help people share information about goods, but what most new sites lack is that kind of Web 1.0 element of using technology to scour the marketplace.