Web client


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Web client

The client side (user side) of the Web. A Web client typically refers to the Web browser in the user's machine or mobile device. It may also refer to extensions and helper applications that enhance the browser to support special services from the site. Contrast with Web server. See browser extension.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Web client is used to integrate the virtual assistant in the customer's website.
Now HTML5 client is the only web client available for purchase with further updates and improvements from EvenBet Gaming.
Last year, we streamlined and accelerated our network management solution with the Fluidic web client. Now, we're bringing the Fluidic's speed and simplicity to OpUtils.
web client to our iOS users due to Apple platform limitations." It added.
Three key benefits of the Rand Secure Archive EWA web client include:
One of the main limitations was that only a single web client software was used (namely Mozilla Firefox, see details below) so as to eliminate extrinsic fluctuations in measured data due to different implementation of client http communication functions.
In addition, attacks against web browsers and web client applications such as QuickTime and Flash have tripled in the first half of the year and are often the main entry point for attackers to gain access to a network.
LABWORKS LIMS 6.1 is a laboratory information management system with a zero footprint Web client. It is designed to be effectively deployed with minimal user training and to consistently perform on a wide variety of Web browsers, supporting the unique needs of laboratories, from pre-login sample organization through reporting and data distribution.
These include integrated search, single-copy mail store, discovery, anti-spam and anti-virus/security capabilities on the back end, and a rich, full-featured, AJAX-based Web client that brings e-mail and calendar items to life through Web mash-ups on the front end.
When a document becomes available, any Web client, including a standard desktop browser, is capable of accessing it.