web page

(redirected from Web pages)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.
Related to Web pages: web browser, HTML, Web server, Dynamic Web pages

Web page

[′web ‚pāj]
(computer science)
A document written in HTML and available for viewing on the World Wide Web, may contain images, sound, video, formatted text, and hyperlinks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

web page

(World-Wide Web)
A block of data available on the World-Wide Web, identified by a URL. In the simplest, most common case, a web page is a file written in HTML, stored on the server. It may refer to images which appear as part of the page when it is displayed by a web browser. It is also possible for the server to generate pages dynamically in response to a request, e.g. using a CGI script.

A web page can be in any format that the browser or a helper application can display. The format is transmitted as part of the headers of the response as a MIME type, e.g. "text/html", "image/gif".

An HTML web page will typically refer to other web pages and Internet resources by including hypertext links.

A website often has a home page (usually just the hostname, e.g. http://foldoc.org/). It may also have individual home pages for each user with an account at the site.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Web page

A Web page is one of many files that make up a website. For example, when a website is accessed by only its domain name, such as www.computerlanguage.com, the home page is the first page the user sees.

The page is actually a text file coded in HTML and JavaScript with links to separate files (images, videos, buttons, etc.) that also appear on the page. See HTML and World Wide Web.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
As expected, the FTDS questionnaire web pages (proxy rater and driver demographics, driver history, and 54 driving skill items) were the most viewed with 79.56 web page views.
n is the number of retrieved web pages including the link l.
The majority (80.0%, 12/15) of the claims had links to web pages originating from the USA.
On the basis of the two assumptions above, the PageRank algorithm will initially endow all Web pages with equal scores for their importance level, and then update the PageRank score values of each page node via iteration recursive calculation until the scores become stable.
It is vital to extract critical and suitable features from rendered web pages. It is also very helpful to improve the accuracy of feature similarity computation.
Fukushima et al proposed the usage certain domain features in detecting and blacklisting malicious web pages [10].
The third problem is related to the organization of information extracted from within Web pages. When finding a piece of information that is useful within a Web page, students may extract it and place it in an appropriate position in a text editor.
Professors should consider employing course discussion Web pages in light of the results of the current research showing that participation is linked to positive course outcomes, especially in advanced psychology courses as topics move from fact-based information to more critical analysis of information.
Another tip: Check that your media relations web page does pop up when searching for the following keywords: media, news, public relations, PR, media relations, press, and journalist.
Another way the IT department is able to enhance speed and accuracy is by creating subcollections for various departments' Web pages. Yee explains that if a user searches for the County's Regional Occupation Program, or ROP, the search results would find all the documents associated with it.
Creating Database-Backed Library Web Pages Using Open Source Tools
A classic example is the Google search engine, which returns the most-linked-to Web pages first (instead of returning thousands of pages in no particular order, as early search engines sometimes did).