WebCompass

WebCompass

A Web search tool developed by Quarterdeck that ran under Windows, polled Web search engines, and summarized the results. Symantec acquired Quarterdeck in 1999.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the numerous stand-alone search engines, we mention Verity Search97, Harvest, OpenText's LiveLink Search and Spider, Altavista Search, QuarterDeck's WebCompass, and Excite for Web Servers.
WebCompass, Quarterdeck, http:// arachnid.qdeck.com/qdeck/products/wc20
Name URL Platform Cost BullsEye http://www.intelliseek.com Win 95/98/NT $49 Copernic 99 http://www.copernic.com Win 95/98/NT $29.95 Infoseek Express http://express.infoseek.com Win 95/98/NT Free FerretSoft http://www.ferretsoft.com Win 95/98/NT $49.95 Mata Hari http://www.thewebtools.com Win 95/98/NT $34.95 Sherlock N/A Mac O/S 8.5 Free WebCompass http://arachnid.qdeck.com/qdeck/ products/wc20/fullproductinfo.html Win 95/98/NT $49 WebSeeker http://www.bluesquirrel.com/ products/seeker/webseeker.html Win 95/98/NT $49.95 These are the five metasearch engines that we felt offered superior performance.
Quarterdeck's WebCompass is one of the most powerful, allowing you to specify search categories (business, let's say) that determine which sites will be queried (CNN Financial Network, for instance).
Quarterdeck Corporation has announced its new PC-based World Wide Web search system, WebCompass, Personal Edition.
WebCompass lets users build a personalized index of topics and store the data they want in a database that uses the Microsoft Access 2.0 database file format.
WebCompass search engine will use in the future to sort data during updates.
Using WebCompass, searchers can also automatically update results, store them locally on the PC, and assign rankings to them.
When a user enters a query or topic of interest, WebCompass polls multiple search engines, such as Lycos and InfoSeek, for relevant Web pages.
WebCompass, Personal Edition, which will cost under $100, works with any Web browser and runs on a 486-based PC with a minimum of 8 megabytes of memory, with 16 megabytes recommended.
WebCompass also lets users build a personalized index of topics that they are interested in and store retrieved data in a database based in the Microsoft Access 2.0 file format.
We can envision a time in the not-too-distant future when there will be higher and predictable bandwidth, WebCompasses, and focused collections of age-appropriate materials on the Web.