Webster's Dictionary


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Webster's Dictionary

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Also, to add to the absurd humor of the situation, Judge Stephen, of the High Court of Justice, spoke the final word that compelled the telephone legally to be a telegraph, and sustained his opinion by a quotation from Webster's Dictionary, which was published twenty years before the telephone was invented.
Webster's Dictionary gives the meaning of the word 'miasma' as 'an infection floating in the air; a deadly exhalation'; and, in the opinion of Mr Robert Ferguson, his late employer, that description, though perhaps a little too flattering, on the whole summed up Master Roland Bean pretty satisfactorily.
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He edited an edition of Webster's Dictionary, and his speciality was Yiddish; he was an ordained rabbi.
Webster's Dictionary defines meekness in part as "deficient in spirit or courage".
In my Webster's dictionary, dissident is defined as, "One who disputes the doctrine or authority of an established church." The truth is, those now in majority are the true dissidents.
Look up the word "solstice" in Webster's Dictionary and it reads: the time of year when the sun reaches its northernmost point on the celestial sphere.
RICHARD KOSTELANETZ' is honored with individual entries in Contemporary Poets, Contemporary Novelists, Postmodern Fiction, Contemporary Jewish-American Dramatists and Poets, Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, A Reader's Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers, the Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature, Webster's Dictionary of American Authors, The HarperCollins Reader's Encyclopedia of American Literature, NNDB.com, and the Encyclopedia Britannica, among other distinguished directories.
But we frequently overlook the history of the word "franchise." According to Webster's Dictionary, franchise is rooted in the French word "franchir," meaning "to free." Webster's also includes a definition of franchise as "the right or license granted to an individual to market a company's goods or services in a particular territory." That pretty well reflects our understanding of the word, but that's a relatively modern definition of franchise.
While both words are commonly used in the U.S., toward is, in the words of Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, "undoubtedly prevalent."
Updated for 2006, the new Webster's dictionary New Explorer Encyclopedic Dictionary (1596950072 $39.95) provides coverage of modern American English as it's used today in the academic and business worlds.
Webster's dictionary defines theology as "the study of God and his relation to the world, especially by analysis of the origins and teachings of an organized religious community (as the Christian Church)." No matter how Religious Right leaders try to cloak their concept of "intelligent design"--"creation science," call it what they will--it is a theological precept.

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